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App for That

App for That

Travel App Lets Users Create Their Own Tours — And Get Paid

A sample Stray Boots tour. (Stray Boots)

Stray Boots, the travel app that lets you download interactive tours, is now making room for user-generated content.

Founder Avi Millman started the company back in 2009, after a family trip to Rome.

“We were visiting a bunch of different locations like the Pantheon, the Colosseum — I felt like I was sort of on a scavenger hunt, checking spots off on my list,” he told Betabeat. “It struck me that tour guide experiences are just extremely passive experiences, and not particularly social. If you could turn exploring a city into a game, you could make it a lot more fun, engaging and social.” Read More

App for That

Add Some Tech to Your Seder With New Bronfman Haggadah App

The Bronfman Haggadah, in app form. (Screengrab: iTunes store)

At traditional Passover celebrations, participants read from the Haggadah: a book that tells the story of Passover and outlines the steps of the seder. It’s a time-honored tradition, but with kids these days being into their “technology,” a member of the famed Bronfman clan has decided to turn her family’s Haggadah into an app.

Around this time last year, the Bronfman family (yes, that Bronfman family) celebrated the release of the Bronfman Haggadah, written by the late Edgar M. Bronfman and illustrated by his wife, Jan Aronson. The hardcopy Haggadah was very popular amongst Jews of all different levels of religiousness, Ms. Aronson told Betabeat. Read More

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This App Lets You Secretly Leave Annoying Group Texts

(GroupXiT)

Is there anything more annoying than being stuck in a group text about your second cousin’s bridal shower, and getting updated every time someone sends a message debating the pros and cons of bridal bingo? No. There is not.

Thankfully, there’s a new solution for that: GroupXiT, an app that lets you stealthily remove yourself from group texting threads you’re no longer interested in. Additionally, if there’s a person in the conversation who’s really annoying you — maybe someone’s using way too many wedding-themed hashtags — the app also lets you stop seeing their messages in the thread on your phone. Read More

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Are You On The List? App Keeps Unwanted Guests Out of Parties

zkipster ipad app angry man

Parties are fun, but getting past a phalanx of publicists and event planners can be quite a production, even for people with invitations.

Swiss startup founder David Becker realized this when he was throwing a party to fête one of his products in 2008.

“We had 1,000 people on the list and couldn’t get them in fast enough,” Mr. Becker told Betabeat. “We had stacks and piles of paper. The problem is always the same … the paper guest list.” Read More

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New App ‘Dumbstruck’ Captures Reactions To Your Texts

Dumbstrucks' interface (Facebook)

This week we came across Dumbstruck, a new app that lets you send photo messages to your friends—and then watch videos of their actual reactions. Suddenly there’s a lot more pressure riding on that bikini mirror shot, huh?

Dumbstruck was founded by Michael Tanski and Peter Allegretti at their Albany-based mobile app idea lab, Doctored Apps. It launched at the end of December 2013, and has since attracted tens of thousands of users, according to Joe Masciocco, who heads up strategy for the app. Read More

App for That

Rap Genius Launches Shazam-esque Lyrics App

Something for pretty much everyone. (Screengrab: itunes.apple.com)

Fresh off the Christmas Day SEO snafu that had Google leaving their site for dead (to Google’s own detriment), the guys of Rap Genius have launched an app.

The app, called Genius, connects to users’ iPhone music players, allowing them to read and annotate lyrics while listening to songs. A button allows users to get the lyrics for what they’re listening to, or the songs in their iTunes Library. Read More

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Cameo Will Now Let You Convince Your Parents You’re A Professional Videographer

Screen Shot 2014-01-15 at 8.40.18 AM

Last October marked the launch of Cameo, an app that lets you edit your crappy, amateur smartphone footage into high-def, professional-quality videos, and share them with your friends and followers. The app has reported big success in its first three months of life, proving that maybe there’s actually a market for videos that aren’t just shaky thirty-second shots of cats freaking out over printers. Read More