The Facebookers Will Inherit the Earth

Sean Parker Wants to Remind Everyone He’s Totes a Facebook Cofounder

He will correct you on Twitter if you suggest otherwise.
 Sean Parker Wants to Remind Everyone Hes Totes a Facebook Cofounder

Mr. Parker (flickr.com/mager)

Where are the original Facebookers these days? Well, Zuck is attempting to steer Facebook through the rocky shoals of a slipping stock price. Peter Thiel is unloading his stock and donating to Tea Partiers. Eduardo, presumably, is popping bottles with models in Singapore.

Meanwhile, as the Huffington Post reports, Sean Parker is defending his legacy on Twitter.

Back in late July, Sean Parker told the New York Times that, “Every good entrepreneur I know ends up in the wasteland of being a venture capitalist. It’s really frustrating.” Right, well, as Inc. writer John McDermott proceeded to point out, Mr. Parker hasn’t spent the last few years setting the tech world on fire:

Since Parker is so quick to judge, we presume he’d include himself on that list of brave entrepreneurs [who continue to found new, successful companies]. But his track record is a bit spottier.

Yes, Mr. Parker has Napster and Plaxo to his credit. However:

Parker’s entrepreneurial activity has leveled off a bit since then. He became the inaugural president at Facebook–yet although he is frequently cited as an integral part of the company’s early success, it wasn’t his endeavor.

Mr. McDermott also called Airtime’s launch “more buzz than business.”

Well, perhaps Mr. Parker was doing a little idle self-Googling yesterday, because he suddenly went on a Twitter tirade, rebutting Mr. McDermott’s post:

(Please note: This is best imagined with Justin Timberlake portraying Mr. Parker.)

This puts last year’s reported screaming match with Zuck in perspective, no?

At any rate, Mr. Parker added, he was making a larger point about something grander than mere business:

Mr. Parker seems to have confused the definition of entrepreneurship with that of poker. Despite the similarities, one is usually considered to involve starting a company.

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