Topic:

streaming music

streaming music

Baby Boomer Beef: Pink Floyd Fighting With Pandora Is Your New Favorite Summer Sideshow

$$$$$ (Screencap, "Money" music video)

Money! It’s a gas, at least until you decide someone’s screwing you out of your rightful cut, and then it gets ugly. Take, for example, the PR war currently brewing between Pandora and the musical icons of Pink Floyd.

Earlier this week, the crotchety rockers took to the pages of USA Today (way to show your years there, guys) to voice their opinion of the streaming radio service. They are not fans. “Pandora is pushing for a special law in Congress to slash musicians’ royalties – and the tactics they are using to trick artists into supporting this unfair cut in pay,” the trio complain of the Internet Radio Fairness Act. Read More

streaming music

Spotify’s Business Model Called ‘Unsustainable’

Spotify playlist (screengrab)

In 2010 Swedish music streaming service Spotify was on the rise, with a 151 percent jump in revenue. According to PrivCo, a company that tracks financial data, the bottom almost fell out for Spotify in 2011 and the service’s current model is “unsustainable.”

CNET obtained confirmation from Spotify that numbers reported by PrivCo were correct–but not news. Spotify’s losses since jumping into the U.S. market were first reported in August by the Wall Street Journal.

Regardless of who reported what first, PrivCo’s assessment might sting at Spotify HQ: Read More

streaming music

Dear Bands, Stop Treating Spotify Like Netflix

Spotify playlist (screengrab)

Subscription music services face a new scourge on their bottom line: “Windowing.” This vaguely creepy term stands for a practice adopted by some artists in an effort to boost album sales. Musicians such as Adele and Coldplay withhold new albums from the likes of Spotify for a period of time after release, just as there is about a month’s delay between the release of a new film and that film becoming available on Netflix. Spotify in particular hates the practice, and Spotify’s chief content officer Ken Parks told Fast Company so in no uncertain terms: Read More