Topic:

Planet Reddit

Planet Reddit

Reddit Launches Crowdfunding Site That Basically Just Sells T-Shirts

Screen Shot 2014-10-29 at 12.57.49 PM

Everybody is getting in on the crowdfunding game. In a space previously dominated by Kickstarter and Indiegogo, now everyone who wants to up their ecommerce game is starting their own crowdfunding platforms — just this week, Amazon launched their own crowdsourcing page for book ideas so that they can further erode the American literary tradition.

As of this morning, Reddit launched their own crowdfunding site, called Redditmade, into open beta. It’s a natural extension of the Reddit ethos, given that crowdfunding is basically upvoting with money, and Reddit is the poster child for upvote-driven communities — even if that title should really belong to Imgur. Read More

Planet Reddit

Reddit’s /r/UpliftingNews Bans Huffington Post For Stealing Article Ideas

Screen Shot 2014-09-12 at 3.53.18 PM

Reddit has a complicated relationship with the media. On one hand, Reddit is a place for organizing content — besides the typical viral stock that’s already trending on Imgur, news sites provide much of Reddit’s diet. On the other hand, Reddit is sick of being a source for journalists who don’t acknowledge the source of their posts.

Moderators from/r/UpliftingNews posted a “PSA” Thursday declaring a ban on all Huffington Post articles from here on out. According to the mod, editors from HuffPost’s Good News vertical have been pillaging the subreddit for leads and content without giving the subreddit or its posters proper credit. Accord to the post: Read More

Planet Reddit

This Insane Relationship Advice Subreddit Is Basically an Online Soap Opera

It's basically just this over and over. (Photo via Pixabay, Ryan McGuire)

A long time ago, before there was Internet, people with problems would seek counsel from designated advice professionals. They would do this by writing to a newspaper or magazine column such as “Dear Abby.”

But nowadays, you don’t have to be an expert with a team of editors to dish out advice to strangers — and if you’re the one seeking advice, your question doesn’t even have to be particularly good. Thanks to the wonders of Reddit, all you need is access to a computer and the ability to type. Read More

Planet Reddit

Neckbeard Support Group Thrives on Reddit Front Page

The South Park episode that changed one former neckbeard's life. (Screengrab: YouTube)

Redditor thewriter_anonymous posed two simple questions yesterday to the Reddit community: “Ex-neckbeards of reddit, when did you realize you were one of “those” guys? Any cringeworthy stories you’d like to share?”

For clarification, he also posted an Urban Dictionary definition of “neckbeard” — “a talkative, self-important nerdy man who, through an inability to properly decode social cues, mistakes others’ strained tolerance of his blather for evidence of his own charm.” Read More

Planet Reddit

This Woman Got Paid To Snuggle Sad Old Divorced Men

KonekoPeach, former professional snuggler. (Imgur)

Reddit AMAs are incredible educational tools. They’ve taught us what it’s like to have two dicks; proved to us that Canadian stereotypes are all true; even illuminated Lil’ John’s fascinating opinions of snowboarding. And now, we finally know what it’s like to be a professional snuggler.

Yes, you’re reading that right: redditor KonekoPeach was not a professional smuggler, but a professional snuggler — as in, a person paid to crawl into bed with and wrap their arms around a lonely stranger for hours at a time, as she explained in an AMA yesterday.

She worked for a company called The Snuggle Buddies, which claims to be strictly non-sexual and charges anywhere from $60 for an hour-long snuggle sesh to $400 for a ten-hour overnight extravaganza. KonekoPeach seems to have generally enjoyed the experience, though she quit when she began to sense the whole thing was just maaaaybe a little sketchy and unsafe. Read More

Planet Reddit

Reddit Back In The Red: Site To Give 10% Of Ad Revenue To Charity

Making money is cool. (Getty)

On Friday, Reddit made an announcement that it would be donating ten percent of its 2014 ad revenue to charity.

According to a blog post by Reddit CEO Yishan Wong, Reddit will calculate its ad revenue at the end of the year, and then let Redditors nominate and vote on the non-profits they’d most like to support. Once the community has determined its top ten non-profits — and yes, Reddit reserves the right to ignore all suggestions from trolls, the post says — the site will distribute the funds proportionally among the winning charities, based on how many votes each one received. Read More