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Booting Up: How Excited Are You For Facebook’s Reader?

HYFR $$$. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

“Uber for healthcare” is a thing that could eventually happen for the one percent. [Valleywag]

Speculation is ramping up that Facebook might finally release its Flipboard knockoff (internally called “Paper”) later this month. Yayyyyyyy? [Recode]

Using the fancy @ symbol, Tumblr users can finally mention each other in their posts. [Verge]

Long live the llama: Aol has officially unloaded Winamp and Shoutcast to Belgian startup Radionomy for $5 to $10 million. [TechCrunch]

Netflix has ordered nine episodes of Marco Polo, a historical drama about something. [Vulture]

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Booting Up: Twitter’s Web Interface Is Getting a Nip/Tuck

New, new Twitter. (Photo: Twitter)

Don’t be alarmed if Twitter looks different for you. The web interface is getting (another) redesign that aligns the look of it with its mobile apps. [TechCrunch]

iPhone supplier Foxconn has shipped 1.5 million devices to China Mobile as the telco preps for its launch. [WSJ]

The Dodo, the Lerer Ventures-backed website about, uh, animals, launched yesterday. [Recode]

Claiming it’s a “consequence of a quickly growing service,” Snapchat got defensive when it apologized for all the “snap spam” you’ve been getting. [Daily Dot]

Katie Couric made her Yahoo debut so text your mom if you want to know how she did. [Politico]

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Booting Up: BlackBerry Really Hopes That Keyboards Are Going to Save Them

The future. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons,by ScaredPoed)

Careful where you tread, Ryan Seacrest: BlackBerry CEO John Chen said the company’s future devices will “predominately” feature physical keyboards. [The Verge]

We’re just going to leave this headline here: “Path Closes $25 Million In New Funding.” [Recode]

Since you need another music streaming service, Beats Music is launching next week for $10 a month. [Fast Company]

An Uber car was attacked by striking taxi drivers in Paris. Apparently, they’re not so pleased with the influx of competitors encroaching on their turf. [CNet]

NBC News is taking a ten percent stake in NowThis News, a Lerer Ventures-backed news agency that specializes in producing short clips for Vine and Instagram. “It allows them to experiment in this new medium without putting their legacy brand at risk,” said Mr. Lerer. [New York Times]

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Booting Up: GMail Is Going To Let Any Old Nigerian Prince On Google+ Email You

Aw, GMail #TBT. (Photo: File)

Steve Ballmer and Bill Gates are scaring potential CEO candidates away from Microsoft because they’re worried they’re going to get bullied by the duo. [WSJ]

Facebook is sunsetting its controversial Sponsored Stories ads in April. [Fast Company]

Google is adding a neat new feature to GMail by letting users access email addresses from Google+, so you can email anyone on the increasingly unavoidable social network. [Gizmodo]

Reading Uber CEO Travis Kalanick’s explanation about his company’s surge pricing model still confuses us–probably because we got C’s in economics. [NYT]

This is how a blind man navigated CES. [Recode]

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Booting Up: T-Mobile CEO Hates Cell Phone Carriers Just As Much As You Do

The future. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons,by ScaredPoed)

T-Mobile CEO John Legere spoke bluntly about his competitors: “This industry blows. It’s just broken. It needs change.” So, the company is paying people’s early termination fees if they switch over. [Ars Technica]

Some say drones are the future, but BlackBerry thinks it’s keyboards. [Recode]

If you’re judging by the reviews, everybody loves Yahoo’s News Digest app. Most likely because they’re all fake. [BuzzFeed FWD

Last year, music streaming increased 32 percent while sales of albums and singles dipped 6.3 percent. Disturbingly, the most-streamed song was “Harlem Shake” so think about that for a while. [WSJ]

Yahoo is looking to spend cable-like money (think $1 to $2 million an episode) on original shows to finally get people to notice it. [AdWeek]

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Booting Up: Start Saving Because Uber’s Surge Pricing Is Here to Stay

"Keep complaining!" - Uber CEO Travis Kalanick (Photo: Tech Cocktail)

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick hears you complaining about surge pricing, but doesn’t care. He says the model is here to stay. [WSJ]

At CES, Yahoo announced a streamlined ad business unit to act as a “central suite of tools for online advertisers to manage all of their buys.” Sounds important. [AdWeek]

Every day Yahoo dreams about content: Marissa Mayer announced the launch of Food and Tech verticals in a splashy presentation that included SNL cast members. [USA Today]

Vine cofounder Dom Hofmann is reducing his role at the company as he focuses his efforts on a new startup. Colin Kroll, the video site’s other founder, will assume his duties. [The Verge]

Avoid Twitter on Feb. 5. That’s when it releases its first-ever quarterly results so you know everyone’s jokes are going to be insufferable. [Recode]

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Booting Up: Used to Bombing, Michael Bay Fled Mid-Presentation at CES

Mr. Bay, fleeing the stage. (Photo: Twitter)

San Francisco is  going to tax Google’s employee shuttles based on the number of stops they make. But the search giant can likely afford it since they’ll only be charged $1 per stop. [WSJ]

Michael Bay did something he’s used to at CES yesterday: he bombed. The director got flustered during a presentation for Samsung and embarrassingly fled the stage. [AdWeek]

Pinterest has reportedly acquired VisualGraph, an image recognition search engine that’s staffed by just two people. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. [BuzzFeed]

For the first time in its ten year history, Mashable is taking on outside investors to the tune of $13.3 million from Updata Partners. [CNN]

Snapchat has hired its first lobbyist. [Recode]

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Booting Up: Zynga Is Accepting Fake Money (Bitcoins) To Plow Your Fake Fields

She was fired. (Photo: Zynga)

Zynga is accepting bitcoins as a form of payment in some of its games that people still apparently play. [WSJ]

Yahoo has a lot of clunkers under its hood, like Answers, so why won’t they sell them? [Recode]

Facebook is jamming your News Feed with ads, but not as an effort to annoy you (that’s just a fun side effect). Rather, it’s to keep employees from jumping ship before the job is complete. [Quartz

Similar to what it already does for creating playlists, Pandora is mining your music history to better tailor its ads. [New York Times]

Apple has bought the company behind Snappycam, a $1 photo app that lets users take photos in rapid succession. [CNBC]

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Booting Up: Netflix Has 77,000 Sub-Categories So Why Does It Always Suggest The Office?

Soon. (Photo: Netflix)

Uber is distancing itself from an accident in San Francisco that killed a six-year-old. The company says the car wasn’t providing an Uber service during the incident so they’re not at fault. [PandoDaily]

Amazon is slowly putting on its boxing gloves against Netflix. It quietly rolled out its first ad for Prime Instant online video. [Recode]

Netflix has 77,000 sub-categories even though you’re just going to watch 30 Rock again. [Atlantic]

Apparently PlayStation 4 owners watch three times as much porno compared to their Xbox One counterparts. [BuzzFeed FWD]

CES is going to be flooded with celebrities like, uh, Olivia Munn. [AdWeek]

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Booting Up: The Syrian Electronic Army Rings In the New Year By Hacking Skype

Wealthy man, Mr. Cook (Photo: News.au)

The Syrian Electronic Army didn’t take the day off yesterday. The hacker collective took over Skype’s website and Twitter accounts warning people that they’re being spied on. [Daily Dot]

AllThingsD is dead, ReCode is alive. [New York Times]

Apple CEO Tim Cook’s salary last year is more than you can ever imagine despite taking a ten percent pay cut. [BGR]

Winamp isn’t dead after all. Aol is reportedly selling it and Shoutcast to Radionomy, a Belgium-based aggregator of radio stations. [TechCrunch]

The alleged hackers behind the Snapchat’s massive leak of usernames and phone names explain that they did it to “put public pressure on Snapchat to get this exploit fixed.” The app still hasn’t publicly commented on the flaw. [The Verge]