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Kids These Days

Kids These Days

High School Kids Earning $4K a Month Through Gaming Site ROBLOX

A screengrab from Mr. Correira's game, Paintball!. (Screengrab: YouTube)

Josh Correira will start his freshman year at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute this fall, but already the 18-year-old is raking in up to $4,000 a month — all because he programmed an online video game.

Mr. Correira has been making money through ROBLOX, an online platform where users — typically kids and teens — create and play games featuring blocks of different shapes, sizes and colors. ROBLOX launched its Developer Exchange program last October, wherein creators can convert the virtual currency earned through their games — called ROBUX — into real live cash. Read More

Kids These Days

The Netflix For Children’s Books Adds 1000 Titles From HarperCollins

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Epic!, a subscription app for children’s books, just closed a deal with HarperCollins that will give its subscribers access to over 1000 books, including classics like The Chronicles of Narnia, Frog and Toad, and The Secret Garden. This comes on the heels of last night’s announcement that Oyster has signed a similar — but much larger — deal with Simon & Schuster.

Epic! has only been available for two months, and has already landed deals with two of the five top publishers, the other being Simon & Schuster. Epic! cofounder Kevin Donahue says that the appeal of book subscription apps for big publishers is that they can make money off of older books that otherwise wouldn’t even find their way onto shelves. Read More

Kids These Days

Thanks to iPads, Toddlers Are Totally Over Toy Blocks

Kids don't know how to do this anymore. (Wikimedia Commons)

Here’s a frightening thought regarding the future of humankind: according to The Telegraph, children born in the digital age are so addicted to technology, they’re forgoing playing with blocks, pens and paper.

Members of the UK’s Association of Teachers and Lecturers are warning that the addiction is leaving children as young as three with no dexterity in their fingers but the ability to swipe a touch screen with ease. Read More

Kids These Days

Kids Aren’t Reporting Cyberbullying Because They Don’t Want Their Phones Confiscated

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Today in really, really sad news, kids these days would apparently rather endure cyberbullying than not have a smartphone or laptop, Ireland’s Independent reports.

The theory belongs to Dr. Conor McGuckin, an assistant professor in education psychology at Trinity College, Dublin. According to Dr. McGuckin, who spoke at a recent Cyber-Ethics Public Forum, kids are often scared to report cases of cyberbullying to their parents because they don’t want them to confiscate their smartphones, tablets and laptops. Instead, they’d rather suffer the torment in silence. Read More

Kids These Days

Daughter Monetizes Her Dad By Billing Him for Tech Support

Computer repair.

If I had a dollar every time my parents asked me to fix the printer or repair the Internet, I’d be in the Maldives sipping a Bud Light Lime. Sadly I never negotiated that deal with them, but that doesn’t mean others haven’t disrupted their parents’ wallets. Australia’s news.com.au reports that one conniving daughter billed her dad for replacing his laptop’s hard drive and Read More

Kids These Days

It Sucks to Be a Teen on the Internet Today

OMG!! (Photo: Family.go.com)

In the mid-90s, when this reporter was in elementary school, we developed a code for AOL instant messenger to alert our chat buddies whenever our parents had entered the room or were looking over our shoulders. “1,” we would type, when they were lurking around, to let our buddies know not to type anything inappropriate, and “11″ when they eventually left.

We were rarely actually talking about anything that could get us into real trouble–back then “inappropriate” meant the boys we had crushes on and articles about the Spice Girls that we weren’t technically allowed to read because they were in grownup magazines like Vogue. But we enjoyed the conspiratorial feeling of having a secret language, of having something that belonged to us and only us. It was a treasured part of being young–and it is apparently something that teens today don’t get to enjoy.

According to an article in the New York Times, parents are using our quantitative obsession to track their teens’ every move. And it’s not just online, but on their phones, in the car and when they’re out and about, too. Read More

Kids These Days

Online Video Chatting–All the Rich White Girls Are Doing It

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“Warning to parents,” Vator News cried out yesterday, “this is what your teen does online.” Exclamation points implied! So what’s the terrifying new teen pastime parents should be panicked about? According to Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, teenagers are, get this, using online video.

The actual study doesn’t adopt Vator New’s fear-mongering tone, except in the way that all sentences about the online activities of teenagers sound like they’re pulled from a “Nightline” investigation. “Nearly 2 in 5 online teens (37%) say they have video chatted with someone else using applications such as Skype, iChat or Googletalk.” Ahhhhh, lock up your kids. Read More