Topic:

Internet Art

Internet Art

Photographer Uses iPad Finger Grease to Make ‘Art’

Screen Shot 2014-07-14 at 11.51.01 AM

Tablets remember so much more than we realize. As we tap and swipe our way mindlessly through ebooks, dating apps and addictive games, we’re creating not just a browsing history, but a physical history of our interactions.

Surface Tension, a new series by New Mexico photographer Meggan Gould, illuminates the ghostly traces we leave on tablets with our fingers. For the series, she scanned and digitally edited the dark screens of a few iPads that were circulating among her family members. Read More

Internet Art

NowThis News Goes Retro, Narrates the Election With Twitter ASCII Art

10 Photos

Wyoming

NowThis News, the recently launched video news site created by ex-HuffPo founders Eric Hippeau and Ken Lerer, opted for an old-fashioned approach to deliver election results on a new-fangled platform. As the tweets poured by at an impossible-to-follow rate, NowThis News stuck out with a very web 1.0 approach: ASCII art.

The NowThis site (formerly called Planet Daily) currently pulls in newsy video clips from sites like Twitter, Facebook and–most typically–Buzzfeed, another Lerer Ventures portfolio company. The company’s Twitter handle, @NowThisNews, is run by its social editor, Drake Martinet, who’s also an adjunct professor at Stanford. Mr. Martinet said that 90 percent of the video content on the site is produced by the NowThis team. Read More

Internet Art

New York Tech’s Love Affair With the Animated GIF Grows via Anil Dash

Did you know that silent films are now the most popular form of entertainment in America? No, not through some awful retro-hipster resurgent of Nickelodeans or Netflix’s repeated suggestion that we add Buster Keaton to our instant streaming queue. It’s the slow but steady growth of the animated GIF, an almost vestigal file type from the early internet era that has become the medium of choice for quick, viral communication of humor, sports and even art.

That’s according to Anil Dash, who did a little back of the envelope calculation based on Tumblr’s page views and the site’s GIF-happy users. If just one in 20 of the 180 million Tumblr posts a day contains an animated GIF, and you factor in all the other sources of GIF goodness like 4chan and B3ta, nearly 3.3 billion people will watch one of these short, silent animations each year. Read More