Topic:

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

Report: Twitter Caves, Will Hand Over OWS Protestor’s Tweets

(Photo: Scott Beale, Laughing Squid)

For months, Twitter has gone back and forth with the District Attorney’s office over one user’s tweets related to the Occupy Wall Street protests. That user, Malcolm Harris, is being charged with disorderly conduct, and the tweets in question may help cement the case against him. Twitter originally appealed the subpoena to provide them, but earlier this week Judge Matthew A. Sciarrino Jr. told the company it had until today to cooperate or face a fine for contempt of court.

Now the Post says that Twitter will cooperate, and a report from Reuters seems to corroborate. Read More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

Twitter Officially Appeals New York Judge’s Ruling to Provide Tweets of Occupy Wall Street Protester

(Photo: Scott Beale, Laughing Squid)

As promised, today Twitter officially appealed the ruling of Judge Matthew A. Sciarrino Jr. that required the company to provide tweets by Occupy Wall Street protestor Malcom Harris published during an October 2011 demonstration. Last month, Twitter’s legal counsel Ben Lee announced the company would be appealing, but the document was officially filed today. Read More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

Twitter Appeals New York Judge’s Ruling That the Company Hand Over Occupy Wall Street Tweets

(Photo: Scott Beale, Laughing Squid)

The legal battle between Twitter and the Manhattan Criminal Court is heating up. Just a few weeks ago, we reported that Judge Matthew A. Sciarrino Jr. struck down Twitter’s protest of a subpoena requiring it to hand over tweets by Malcolm Harris, an Occupy Wall Street protestor who was arrested for disorderly conduct during the Brooklyn Bridge protests.

Today, Twitter counsel Ben Lee announced–via Twitter, natch–that the company will be appealing Judge Sicarrino’s decision, stating that, “It doesn’t strike the right balance between the rights of users and the interests of law enforcement.” Read More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

Twitter Transparency Report: More Evidence That America Is Not the Greatest Country in the World

(Photo: TVgasm.com

Twitter has taken a page from the Google playbook and unveiled its first-ever transparency report to shed light on government requests for user information and government requests to withhold content.  As was the case in Google’s recent report, the U.S. of A. leads the pack . . . . in demanding information about its citizensRead More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

New York Judge Overrules Twitter: Tweets Broadcast to the Public ‘Belong to the Public’

(Photo: Scott Beale, Laughing Squid)

Things are not looking very good for Malcolm Harris, the Occupy Wall Street protestor who was arrested for disorderly conduct for taking place in the 2011 protest march across the Brooklyn Bridge. Back in April, a Judge ruled that your tweets are not your own, striking down a motion from Mr. Harris’s lawyer to block the courts from subpoenaing his tweets.

Twitter stood up for Mr. Harris in May, protesting the subpoena on several grounds, including the fact that the company’s terms of service explicitly state that all users own their content. Twitter’s Legal counsel, Ben Lee, told Betabeat, “As we said in our brief, ‘Twitter’s Terms of Service make absolutely clear that its users *own* their content.’ Our filing with the court reaffirms our steadfast commitment to defending those rights for our users.”

Unfortunately for Twitter, the company’s motion was overturned today by Manhattan Criminal Court Judge Matthew A. Sciarrino Jr., who demanded that Twitter furnish Mr. Harris’s tweets. “While noting that laws regarding social media are evolving, [the judge] held that public speech, regardless of the forum, does not enjoy the protections of private speech,” reports the New York Times. Read More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

Your Tweets Are Not Your Own, Says New York Judge

(Photo: Scott Beale, Laughing Squid)

You must have known those terms of service you didn’t read would come back to bite you in some Orwellian way. This can’t be good, said a tiny voice in the corner of your mind as you clicked “yes” on Twitter’s lengthy legalese. Oh well! Hashtags! But a New York judge just ruled that the state does not need a warrant to subpoena “any and all user information” related to a Twitter account. Why? Because your tweets belong to Twitter.

The question came up in the case of an Occupy Wall Street protester who is being charged with disorderly conduct during a march across the Brooklyn Bridge. The defense’s legal team filed a motion to quash the subpoena, which was just denied. Read More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

New York City Subpoenas More Tweets

Picture 7

Today Jeff Rae (@jeffrae), a self-described rabble rouser, agitator, organizer and labor activist, posted a letter to Scribd that he received from Twitter informing him that the micro-blogging platform had received a legal process for information related to his account. The letter said that the legal process “requires Twitter to produce documents related to your account” in seven days unless he’s filed a motion to “quash the legal process.” Read More

All Your Tweets Are Belong to Us

Occupy Wall Street Twitter Subpoena Should Be Thrown Out, Says Lawyer

Mr. Harris's Twitter avatar. (twitter.com/@destructuremal)

The Manhattan District attorney recently faxed Twitter a subpoena asking the social media company to appear in court and to bring “any and all user information” related to the Twitter account of Occupy Wall Street protester Malcolm Harris. (No, it wasn’t because Mr. Harris started the rumor that Radiohead was playing in Zuccotti Park: the subpoena is related to Mr. Harris’s alleged disorderly conduct during the famous Saturday march that got more than 700 protesters arrested for walking in the street over the Brooklyn Bridge.) Yesterday, Mr. Harris’s lawyer asked the court to toss the subpoena, calling overbroad, improper and abusive, according to the New York Times. But would Twitter have heeded the call? Read More