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ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

Don’t Worry, Internet: That Rickrolling Video is Back Up

(unrealitymag.com)

Did you think a little trademark infringement could obliterate one of the Internet’s longest standing memes? Think again, AVG Technologies.

TorrentFreak reported earlier that a copyright claim filed by AVG has led YouTube to pull one of the most popular uploads of Rick Astley’s famous “Never Gonna Give You Up” music video, which has been viewed over six million times. Ars Technica reported it, too. But when we clicked on the video, it didn’t appear to have been taken down at all: in fact, it worked perfectly fine. An editor from Ars Technica confirmed to us via email that the video appeared to be back up for him as well.

It’s unclear what exactly happened: perhaps YouTube pulls videos automatically when they’re reported for copyright violation. But what a terrible 24 hours (at least according to TorrentFreak) that must have been for all of you out there in Internetland!

We’ve reached out to YouTube for comment and will let you know if we hear back.

ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

The New York Times Covers Rage Comics; Goodbye, Rage Comics

ragecomicTimes

The Times has published a definitive Internet Culture Piece a Year Too Late.

The victim: Reddit’s infamous Rage Comic meme. Though you can still find Rage Comics posted daily on Reddit, the joke was probably on the downswing popularity-wise a year ago. The following is the paper of record unwittingly sealing Rage Comics inside vast and unquiet catacombs in the bowels of the Internet where the ghosts of all past memes roam, to float sadly in the ether alongside the howling phantasm of Rick Astley and his 80s bouffant: Read More

ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

New iPhone App Blurtt Helps You Communicate Entirely Through Memes

Ms. Cajide, cofounder of Blurtt. (crunchbase.com)

If a vision of post-apocalyptic America overrun with glassy-eyed teens communicating solely through image macros doesn’t sound appealing to you, you might not be a big fan of Blurtt, the new iPhone app that wants to help you “better express yourself” though memes.

The thinking behind Blurtt goes like this: sometimes words can’t express everything we want them to. In real life, we have gestures, facial expressions and vocal timbres to help convey meaning. But over digital communication, all of these physical cues become moot, and what remains threatens the very existence of semantic devices like sarcasm (see what we did there?). Read More

ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

As ‘Why I Left’ Letters Reach Meme Proportions, Startups Hope Goldman’s Moral Loss Is Their Gain

Letter make Lloyd sad.

If there were a more visual element (perhaps a honey badger or LOLcat) attached to the “Why I Left Company X” genre, the meme would already be cresting to the top of BuzzFeed. Former TechCrunch employees may have thought they had the art of the bomb-throwing exit letter on lockdown, but over the last couple days, they’ve been bested by the their more corporate brethren.

Yesterday, Google’s former engineering director James Whittaker accused the once-great innovation lab of devolving into an advertising machine. And today Goldman Sachs former executive director Greg Smith issued the most damning sayonara since Jerry McGuire. He started by decrying the toxic, profit-hungry culture, then revealed Goldman’s pet name for clients (“muppets”), before going on to level charges of widespread “moral bankruptcy.”

Those missives quickly spawned a parody (“Why I Am Leaving the Empire, by Darth Vader“) and a spin-off (Mr. Smith’s former intern at Goldman tried to jump into the fray.) Both “Greg Smith” and “Goldman Sachs” are already trending topics on Twitter.

The startup world—which never shies away from the world-changing rhetoric, even when it’s being used to shill for American Express—couldn’t have dreamed up a better recruiting strategy than Mr. Smith’s 2,500-word explosion of righteous indignation. Read More

ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

Moot’s New Startup Canvas Celebrates Its First Birthday and One Millionth Post

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Canvas members received a celebratory email in their inbox this morning. The image-driven social website celebrated its first birthday this week, as well as its one millionth post. As a sign the startup is all growns up, Canvas also announced that you no longer have to use Facebook to sign up.  Email notifications “when someone replies or remixes one of your posts” are also now enabled, which should encourage users to visit the site.

When Christopher Poole, the fair-haired boy prince of meme land,  first founded Canvas, it sounded like purposeful departure from his first startup, 4chan. Instead of the malwebolence of the /b/ boards, users were asked to “Keep it safe for work | Don’t be mean | Stay on topic.” That may have helped the startup pick up $3.63 million in funding, but it yielded mixed results, at first. (Nazi necrophilia, anyone?)

But that appears to have changed. Read More

ALL YOUR MEME BELONG TO US

Sorry: Texts From Bennett, Your New Favorite Blog, Is All Just a Lie (Made Up By That “Look At Me Now” Kitchen Rapper)

Oh, Bennett: Destroyer of dreams, kinda.

Maybe you’ve heard of Texts From Bennett? It’s a Tumblr that’s blazed an incredible, viral trail through the internet over the past few days, made up of texts from some anonymous blogger’s younger cousin Bennett, described as a “17 YEAR-OLD” who “THINKS HE’S A CRIP, WORKS AT AMOCO, HAS A GIRLFRIEND NAMED MERCEDES, AND IS ONE OF THE MOST UNINTENTIONALLY FUNNY AND BRILLIANT SOULS ON THE PLANET.” They are also, as the site says, “100% REAL.”

Except, not. Read More