Code or Be Coded

Catching Up With Codecademy: Nothing Says Christmas Like Building Your Own HTML/CSS ‘Code Cards’

Screen shot 2012-12-24 at 10.34.18 AM

Codecademy managed to win the holiday news cycle last year with its Code Year pledge that even got Mayor Bloomberg to learn to code in 2012–or at least tweet his New Year’s resolution. It was hard to miss the headlines crowing about coding as the lingua franca of the 21st century. But despite the best intentions, some of us fell off the wagon, hard. Read More

NYU Tech

NYU and Codecademy Partner To Teach Coding To Undergrads

Zach Simms (Photo: Twitter.com)

With UPenn making moves on the title of “Stanford of the East” and Eric Schmidt advising Cornell on the evolution of its new tech campus, NYU doesn’t want its students left behind in the college tech revolution. Hence the school’s new partnership with Codeacademy. Students in the Steinhardt School’s Department of Media, Culture, and Communication (MCC) can now opt in to a ten-week course where NYU professors and Codecademy instructors will teach them how to code. Read More

Fresh Capital

Codecademy Programs Its Way to a $10M Series B

(Photo: www.successstories.co.in/)

Some may tsk-tsk the “learn to code” meme, but that hasn’t deterred New York-based Codecademy from sticking to its vision of teaching all of us to code. Today, cofounder Zach Sims announced on the company blog that the startup has raised $10M in series B funding from VC firms Kleiner Perkins, Index Ventures and Union Square Ventures, as well as angel investors Yuri Milner and Richard Branson. Read More

Talent Crunch

Codecademy Needs More Coders to Build Tools to Teach People Coding

Codecademy founders Mr. Sims and Mr. Bubinski. (www.successstories.co.in/)

Codecademy, the New York-headquartered startup that builds simple online lessons for aspiring programmers, reportedly hit a million users back in January (including Mayor Mike Bloomberg). Although we’re skeptical about the retention rate, there is no denying that teaching yourself how to code is zeitgeisting. So it’s no surprise to hear that Codecademy, founded by two fresh-faced 21- and 22-year-old wunderkinds, is hiring. Read More

Metro Tech

The Daily News Tries to Find the Next Mark Zuckerberg in New York City

(via the New York Daily News)

Maybe it’s the revelation that Facebook’s IPO might happen as soon as the third week of May (at least according to 143 phone calls made by Kara Swisher and, yes, she’s counting), but it seems like even the local press has Mark Zuckerberg on the brain.

The New York Daily News, a paper about as known for its tech coverage as Zuck is known for his formal wear, decided to pick out 12 tech folks to watch and led with the portentous line, “The next Mark Zuckerberg might be right here in the city, sharing space with a dozen other startups in a loft near Union Square.” HE WALKS AMONG US! Read More

Program or be Programmed

More than 14,011* People Resolved to Learn Code This Year with Codecademy

The fun thing about writing this headline is that more than 100 people are currently signing up to learn to code this year with Codecademy’s new email program. So expect that number to grow rapidly. It’s at 14,011 right now, we’ll let you know where its at when we end this post.

Codecademy is a service that hopes to teach users to program over the web. They graduated from Y Combinator and raised $2.5 million from an impressive group of investors.

Today they introduced a new feature pegged to New Years. It’s called Code Year, and it’s a year long cycle of lessons that arrive in a weekly email. Read More

New Education for the New Economy

Q&A With Code Academy: The Web Needs Architects and It Needs Construction Workers

Time to level up, young coder

Code Academy co-founders, Zach Sims and Ryan Bubinski are the quintessential startup duo. They met at Columbia, where Mr. Sims was studying political science and Mr. Bubinski was studying computer science. They worked on several projects together. Mr. Sims was the biz dev and product guy, Mr. Bubinski the coder.

“I kind of grew to hate it,” said Mr. Sims. “I wanted to be able to get my hands dirty and help build the ideas we were working on.”  Read More