Linkages

Booting Up: That Pesky Business Model Edition

(Photo: Blogger)

Is Snapchat representative of a new wave of apps that tout privacy as the defining feature? Fred Wilson thinks so. [A VC]

Google’s obsessive drive to quickly index and display as much info as possible on search results pages could diminish Wikipedia’s traffic. [Optimize and Prophesize]

Coursera and other startups offering online classes could totally be the future of education…if only they figured out a stable business model. [New York Times]

Marissa Mayer made a Yahoo employee dance to “Gangnam Style” as cruel punishment for not participating in the employee feedback survey. [AllThingsD]

Is Reddit raising a new round at a $400 million valuation? [TechCrunch]

Linkages

Booting Up: More Snapchat Scandals Edition

Two tweens scoffing at your $3 billion offer. (Photo: Digital Trends)

Online privacy pundits might not want to venture over to China any time soon; the country just passed a law requiring citizens to identify themselves when signing up for internet and mobile access. [Bloomberg]

Another Snapchat scandal! Turns out both Snapchat and Facebook’s new Poke app store your videos sent over the services locally, meaning it’s possible to save videos sent to you without the sender ever knowing. [BuzzFeed]

It appears those ads at the top of Wikipedia are paying off: the Wikimedia Foundation has raised $25 million so far in its 2012 fundraiser. [The Next Web]

Someone wants to make a stage show in Las Vegas based on Portal. [The Daily Dot]

John McAfee is at it again. [Wired]

Wiki World

Wikipedia’s Big Data Can Be Used to Predict Summer Box-Office Hits

Robert Downey Jr. (Photo: Wikipedia.org)

If you turned to Wikipedia for a pre-Avengers deep dive into the Marvel canon or refresher on Harry Potter’s defenses against the dark arts, you are apparently not alone. What’s more, your digital breadcrumbs might be a preview of coming box-office receipts. A team of researchers has shown that Wikipedia data can predict how popular a film will be.

A team from the Budapest University of Technology and Economics looked at 312 movies that came out in 2010 (think Inception, Toy Story 3 and Twilight: Eclipse) and built a mathematical model that measured the number of readers and editors for the movie’s Wiki page. The model’s data was juxtaposed with box office earnings and showed almost a 77 percent correlation between popularity on Wikipedia and big opening weekends. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: ‘Difficult’ Jack Dorsey Edition

Oh goodie, it's Monday. (Photo: Cat Food Breath)

Microsoft “accidentally” sent a DMCA takedown notice to Google, asking them to remove pages from TechCrunch, the BBC, Wikipedia and the U.S. Government. Psst… no one cares that much about Windows 8. [TorrentFreak]

Companies are using patents to stifle innovation and the Times is ON IT. [New York Times]

Is EBay staging a pivot? [TechCrunch]

Whoa, you can raise money for a company without Kickstarter? Mind blown. [TechCrunch]

Jack Dorsey apparently got pushed to a backseat role at Twitter because he’s “difficult” to work with. [SiliconBeat]

Speaking of Twitter, who knew CEO Dick Costolo used to be a standup comedian? [New York Times]

Wiki World

You Can Now Make Your Own Free eBook Out of Wikipedia Articles

(Photo: Wikimedia)

If you tend to spend a fair amount of your time online submerged in a Wikipedia K-hole, mindlessly clicking the “Random Article” link until you snap out of it two hours later deeply engrossed in the entry for Kanye West’s song “Power,” then we have some good news for you. Wikipedia has enabled a new feature that allows you to seamlessly curate your own eBook out of Wikipedia articles, all for free. Read More

Literature

It Takes an Open Letter to Wikipedia for Philip Roth to Get a Correction

Mr. Roth, literary lion. (Photo: flickr.com/cdrummbks)

Like any good high school English teacher, Wikipedia requires writers to cite sources. The site can’t have the subject of an article merely leap in and say, “NUH-UH.” How would they ever write anything negative about anyone, were it otherwise? Winona Ryder might like to edit that business about shoplifting right out of her biography, but that doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.

And that is why Philip Roth had to publish an open letter to Wikipedia–in the New Yorker–to get the crowd-created encyclopedia to admit that his book, The Human Stain, was probably not based on the life of literary critic Anatole Broyard. (In the course of his lengthy rebuttal, Mr. Roth refers to it as a “falsity,” based upon “the babble of literary gossip.”) Read More

Internet 911

Wikipedia Goes Down, Internet Immediately Becomes Dumber

The error message. (Photo: Wikipedia)

Good thing school’s out for summer. Wikipedia, the Internet’s favorite knowledge base, has been down for the last 45 minutes.

The Wikimedia foundation tweeted that its engineers are currently working on solving the problem. Betabeat can access individual articles, but gets the above error message when trying to navigate to the main page. Hopefully it should be back up soon.

In the meantime, if you’re jonesing for your Wiki fix, here’s a pro tip: just read the Google cache version of the article. Or just continue to freak out.