XXX in Tech

Gerbils and Gay Bombs: 10 of the Most Obscure Sex Articles on Wikipedia

Look out, mile high club .(Philosophy of Science Portal)

With Wikipedia providing 24/7 access to information about  everything, chances are you’ve used the site to build up your wealth of sexual knowledge at least once. From pages on the basics looked up by preteens to articles on the type of arcane sex move you first heard of in a movie staring Russell Brand, Seth Rogen or someone of that sort, it’s all there. While on an adventure through the depths of Wikipedia, Betabeat discovered some of the most obscure and little-known articles relating to sex. Here they are: Read More

Wiki World

Armenians Asked to Write One Wikipedia Article Each to Promote National Culture

This counts as Armenian culture, right? (Facebook)

Apparently insecure about its lackluster ~online presence~, Armenia is asking its citizens to write at least one Armenia-related Wikipedia article each. Adorable!

The campaign, called One Armenian, One Article, is designed to promote Armenian culture and increase the number of Armenian-language articles on the interwebs, the BBC reports. The campaign began last spring in the form of a YouTube video (spoiler alert: it’s entirely in Armenian), and has now reportedly spread to Armenian TV stations around the world. Read More

FARNAM STREET

The Era of Fake Knowledge: Why It’s Never Been Easier To Fake What You Know

(Wikimedia Commons)

“It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” — Mark Twain

Recently, Karl Taro Greenfeld, a journalist and author, published an op-ed in the New York Times on faking cultural literacy.

“It’s never been so easy,” he wrote, “to pretend to know so much without actually knowing anything. We pick topical, relevant bits from Facebook, Twitter or emailed news alerts, and then regurgitate them.” Read More

Wiki World

90% of Wikipedia Entries on Costliest Medical Conditions Contain Errors

She learned how to do that on Wikipedia. (Photo: Getty)

In case you needed more proof that the Internet is a terrible, no good, very bad place to go for medical information, scientific research has now officially confirmed it.

A new study states nine out of 10 Wikipedia entries on the U.S.’s costliest medical conditions contain “many” factual errors, the BBC reports. In other words, you should definitely stop relying on the Internet for information on all your gross health concerns. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: After Bad Publicity, AOL CEO Reverses Stance on Company’s 401(k)

A peek at Silicon Valley. (Photo: Recode/HBo)

Flappy Bird creator Dong Nguyen couldn’t handle the attention so he pulled the popular game offline. [Gizmodo]

Everyone settle down, the NYPD only has two pairs of Google Glass on hand and aren’t deployed in the field. [WSJ]

After his obnoxious comments about blaming “distressed babies” for rising costs, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong reversed his stance on the company’s 401(k) plan. [Washington Post]

Just 20 percent of traffic to Wikipedia is delivered via mobile devices and they’re trying to fix that. [New York Times]

There’s a trailer for HBO’s new Silicon Valley-themed show, uh, Silicon Valley. It’s very Mike Judge which is a good thing. [Recode]

Linkages

Booting Up: Dick Costolo Resigns as Director of Twitter U.K.

Mr. Costolo (Photo: About.me)

Last week, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo reportedly quit as director of the company’s U.K. arm. The news comes just days after government regulators forced TweetDeck to dissolve following accounting issues. [Sky News]

Bloomberg is apologizing to its clients after allegations that reporters snooped on client terminals to see their Seamless orders or whatever. [CNN Money]

JackThreads’ recent push into international waters, like Australia and the U.K., is doing well for the company’s bottom line as sales overseas now make up 10 percent of its business. [AllThingsD]

Facebook Home is missing features that Android users love (widgets, docks, oh my!) because all of the developers use iPhones. The lack of “droidfooding” is causing them to scramble to add those features to turn around Home’s slow downloads. [TechCrunch]

Here’s a groovy map that shows you where in the world Wikipedia is being edited right now. [Ars Technica]

Elon Musk and David Sacks have left Mark Zuckerberg’s political action group over growing concerns over the support of certain politicians. [AllThingsD]

Linkages

Booting Up: Just Kidding, Some of You Aren’t Getting Google Glass After All

See ya! (Photo: Wikipedia)

How quickly Google giveths, it takes away. The company said it rescinded its Glass offer to some of the #ifihadglass contest winners for not complying with the rules. Bitchy! [CNet]

Sue Gardner, the “driving force” behind Wikipedia’s rapid growth, is stepping down. But don’t edit her page just yet! She isn’t leaving the company for another six months. [NY Times]

Blackberry posted a profit last quarter but Blackberry owners are still waiting for the news to load on their phones. Perhaps BBM it to them? [AllThingsD]

Speaking of not-dead messaging apps, the Wall Street Journal digs into the rapidly growing sector of texting apps that’s siphoned $23 billion in revenue from carriers in 2012. [WSJ]

The BBC has a pretty great feature on the rise of dating websites aimed at people with sexually transmitted diseases, because everyone needs to be loved. [BBC]