Wearable Tech

Intel’s New $500 Smart Bracelet Has Yelp and Not Much Else

MICA, Intel and Opening Ceremony's questionably-useful new wearable device. (MICA)

Ever desperately needed to search Yelp, but have just been so on-the-go that even whipping out your iPhone is inconvenient? Yeah, us neither — which is why we’re a little concerned about Intel’s new wearable.

Spawned from a partnership between Intel and Opening Ceremony, the device is called MICA, or My Intelligent Communication Accessory. Set to debut in early December for the exorbitant price of $495, MICA is a chunky bangle with a screen on the inner wrist, from which users can carry out a series of, quite frankly, pretty unexciting functions. Read More

Wearable Tech

‘Dorothy’ Wearable Device Lets You Escape Blind Dates By Clicking Your Heels

This stealthy wearable tech is controlled by your feet. (Vimeo)

In 1939′s The Wizard of Oz, Dorothy clicked the heels of her ruby slippers together to get back to Kansas. Now that it’s the the 21st century, people might soon be clicking their heels together to escape a terrible first Tinder date.

iStrategyLabs, the D.C.-based creative agency that also brought us the Twitter-controlled paintball gun, recently unveiled a prototype for Dorothy: wearable technology that lets you carry out various smartphone functions by simply clicking your heels together. Read More

Wearable Tech

New Bluetooth-Enabled Smart Shoes Vibrate to Give You Directions

They're not the coolest looking shoes, but they vibrate to give you directions. (Facebook)

We can’t tell if these are better or worse than those godforsaken Vibram toe shoes.

Indian startup Ducere Technologies is about to bestow a new form of high-tech footwear unto the world, the Wall Street Journal reports. Called Lechal shoes, the Bluetooth-enabled smart footwear will sync up with an app on the user’s phone, which is connected to Google Maps. Once a user inputs their destination, the app will command the left and right shoes to vibrate, telling the user which way to turn to reach their destination. Read More

Q&A

Brooklyn Coder Lauren McCarthy Wants To Cure Your Crippling Social Awkwardness

Screen Shot 2014-07-24 at 3.13.25 PM

In a world where your friends can now set you up on virtual blind dates, it’s hard to believe tech could be the solution to any uncomfortable situation.

Lauren McCarthy is a coder and an artist whose strange art experiments put subjects face to face with their deepest social anxieties. She might not be able to cure your crippling awkwardness — or her own, for that matter — but she has designed over two dozen tech-based performances to help you breathe a little easier, even if it just means making a quick getaway. Read More

Goooood Morning Silicon Alley!

Best Tech Events This Week: Startup Weekend Social Impact, Wearable Tech, Fashion 2.0 and More

sponsor_garys_red_tie_new

This is a guest post from Gary Sharma (aka “The Guy with the Red Tie”), founder and CEO of GarysGuide and proud owner of a whole bunch of black suits, white shirts and, at last count, over 40 red ties. You can reach him at gary [at] garysguide.com.

Aug 22-24 is highly anticipated WeWork SUMMER CAMP! (sneak peek). Performances by Girl Talk & St. Lucia. Talks by Lew Frankfort (Coach) & Jessica Lawrence (NYTM). Wine tasting, water sports, yoga, zip-lining! Y’should go, yo! :) Pre-Camp parties (FREE) on July 22 & on July 31. Read More

Old Dogs Learn New Tricks

David Sedaris Buys Fitbit, Becomes Crazed Roving Trash Collector

Mr. Sedaris (Photo via davidsedarisbooks.com)

Popular opinion holds that wearable tech’s biggest drawback is the potential for Big Data to catalog our personal health data and use it to sell us more crap we don’t need.

Few realize, though, that wearing a machine around your wrist that counts your every step can also cause another problem: a total obsession with walking. At least, that’s the case in Stepping Out,” a personal essay in the New Yorker by your cool European-seeming uncle David Sedaris. Read More