Linkages

Booting Up: Tumblr’s Traffic Might Be Declining

eeeeeeesh (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Amazon is denying that it’s developing an “over-the-top” live streaming service for televisions. [The Verge]

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority approved a pilot program last night that requires companies operating employee shuttles (cough Google and Facebook) to obtain permits and pay fees. [Recode]

The Internet is about to have its “big bang.” On Feb. 4, thousands of domain names, like .pizza, will be on sale. [Quartz]

Don’t freak out Marissa with this news, but Tumblr’s traffic is reportedly declining. [Forbes]

Uncarrier T-Mobile is launching Mobile Money, a low-cost bank account for people who are uncomfortable with traditional banks. Interestingly, users can access more than 4,000 ATMs for free. [CNet]

startup rundown

Startup News: The Library of Congress Has a Twitter Problem

Congress Fail Whale (Photo: blogspot.com)

API Rate Limit Exceeded Back in April of 2010, the Library of Congress promised to add every tweet up to that date to its famous archives. But like anyone following too many people at once, it’s just caused one big mess. The library now has an archive of approximately 170 billion tweets totaling to a compressed 133.2 terabytes. Now the librarians of Congress are planning to work with Gnip, the company currently organizing all of the data, to develop a plan for archiving all of the tweets.

Apparently there have already been more than 400 access requests to the Twitter archives from researches doing work on citizen journalism and political communications. Someone needs to teach the librarians how to make lists as soon as humanly possible. Read More

Privacy Police

The NYPD Could Be Reading and Saving Your Call Logs Without a Court Order

(Photo: Getty)

Perhaps it’s time for a burner phone? The New York Times reports that the NYPD has begun quietly and methodically accumulating heaps of call logs and putting them into a searchable database called the Enterprise Case Management System.

It works like this: When someone has their cell phone stolen, the NYPD frequently subpoenas the call logs for that phone, hoping that if the thief used the phone, the recordings will provide evidence that can help track him or her down. But instead of deleting the logs after closing the case, they continue to exist in the NYPD’s database, and could “conceivably be used for any investigative purpose.” Read More