Internet of Things

Report: Internet of Things Devices Have ‘Alarmingly High’ Number of Attack Vulnerabilities

Womp womp. (Facebook)

Thinking of outfitting your home with some snazzy smart devices? Perhaps it’s time to think again — and no, not just because those smart thermostats might not actually detect smoke.

After analyzing 10 of the most popular Internet of Things devices, HP found them to contain an “alarmingly high average number of vulnerabilities per device,” according to a recent report. The vulnerabilities, they wrote, “ranged from Heartbleed to Denial of Service to weak passwords to cross-site scripting.” Oh, joy. Read More

The Singularity is Nigh

Spark Nabs $4.9 Million to Turn Your Kitchen Into ‘The Brave Little Toaster’

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Most early attempts at Internet of Things (IoT) devices, like smart cutting boards and rudimentary wearables, haven’t proven their worth enough to become as important to us as our phones and laptops. But as of this morning, IoT startup Spark has raised $4.9 million to bring us smart objects that might actually be useful.

Until now, Spark has focused on selling home kits that let you take everyday objects like lightbulbs and cutting boards and hook them up with sensors and wifi. The new cash will help Spark move on from selling one-off DIY kits to providing thousands of cores for companies that want to use Spark to power IoT products. Read More

Internet of Things

Older Tech Giants Have Arrived For The ‘Internet Of Things’ Arms Race

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When people hear “Internet of Things,” their first inclination is to think of Google-owned talking thermostats. But it’s the less-buzzworthy global communications titans like Intel and Cisco who have been building up their portfolio of Internet of Things companies over the past few years — and they’re only getting started.

Intel recently bought up Basis Systems, which makes health tracking bands, and Cisco’s portfolio includes companies that put sensors in home utility meters and bicycles. These are companies that made their multinational empires building satellites and wireless networks — and now they want to develop consumer products that put sensors in alarm clocks, hearing aids and thermostats. Read More