Linkages

Booting Up: ‘Hey, the U.S. Totally Cyberattacked Us Too’ – North Korea

Happy Friday. (Photo: Sodahead)

Perhaps feeling jealous of China, North Korea is now accusing the U.S. of committing cyberattacks against it. [Tech in Asia]

We’ve reached the point where online programming could actually make a significant dent at the Emmy’s. House of Cards, anyone? [The Daily Dot]

Google Reader’s demise as a wake up call: what do we lose when we become so wholly reliant on a cloud-based app? [Slate]

More techies have stepped up to the plate to fight gun violence. Big name Silicon Valley investors have launched an “innovation and investment” campaign called Sandy Hook Promise. [TechCrunch]

Guns aren’t the only political issue techies are taking up. Zuck and others are working for high-skilled immigration reform. [Hillicon Valley]

RIP

Internet Resurrection: Digg Will Launch a New and Improved Version of Google Reader

Sad. (Screenshot: Google Reader)

Fretful newshounds and anxious bloggers can stop sitting shiva. Digg, or rather Betaworks’ reboot of old Digg, wants to resurrect yet another ailing online mainstay. On its blog this afternoon, the startup announced it would be building a reader to replace the “much-loved, if under-appreciated” Google Reader.

In the post, Andrew McLaughlin, the former vice president of Tumblr who joined Betaworks as an entrepreneur-in-residence last summer, said Reader’s “early social features were forward-thinking and hugely useful.” However, as with the revamped Digg, the new iteration won’t look exactly like its predecessor: Read More

SHAREBROS

Everybody Hates the New Google Reader, Especially The People Who Designed Google Reader

2 soon 2 say goodbye

Google Reader—trusty stead of many a professional blogger, researcher, and text-obsessed office drone—has gone and gotten itself its hair did. Google gave Reader a makeover; imagine Michael Jackson’s skin pigmentation efforts delivered through G+ after only having ever seen the “Billy Jean” video, and you have yourself an idea of what the change is akin to. The people, let us tell you, are not happy. A sampling? Read More

First World Problems

Marco Arment on RSS: You’re Doing it Wrong

Deep breathes now.

Instapaper creator Marco Arment has some very strong opinions on how people should consume the internet. Putting a bunch of high volume feeds into your RSS reader, for instance, is a rookie mistake that Mr. Arment considers downright destructive, although he admits, “Abuse is probably a more accurate term, then, but it sounds ridiculous to call such a trivial, first-world problem ‘RSS abuse.’” Read More