Silicon Alley U

Interior Fly Through of Cornell-Technion Campus Makes It Look Like Magic, Basically [VIDEO]

interior

In case the aerial fly over video of what Cornell and the Technion’s gleaming campus on Roosevelt Island will look like from the outside wasn’t enough real estate porn for you, the architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) has released an interior fly over spot today as well.

The description of the animation, which was done by the digital production house AJSNY, is as epic as the images: “In 2012, in the year of the Technion’s cornestone centenary, a third millennium cornerstone is to be laid.”

But before the futuristic beauty inspires you to cryogenically freeze yourself until 2037 (the estimated date of completion for the full 2 million sq. ft. build-out), here’s a dash of realism from Mike Caprio at Startup-o-Rama, “I hearby cynically predict it will be very late, very over budget, & less than 1/2 as green as it appears in the video.” He was talking about the exterior shots, but the point still stands. As the commenters over at Hacker News pointed out about our campus confidential feature, just because you promise more, doesn’t mean it can be delivered, especially not in New York City’s thorny development regulations. Read More

Silicon Alley U

Stunning Aerial Video of How Cornell-Technion Campus Will Change the Landscape of New York

Video

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Betabeat has been drooling over renderings of Cornell-Technion’s gleaming $2 billion campus on Roosevelt Island ever since we first saw the specs in October. At the press conference on Monday announcing the winner of the $100 million grant, Cornell President David Skorton debuted a video flyover of the campus and Curbed has the 30 second spot. Read More

Silicon Alley U

Bloomberg Reported to Announce Cornell the Winner of the $100 M. Tech Campus Bid

via Belsky Bits

Who knew a request for proposal to build a tech campus would offer such edge-of-your-seat drama? Late Sunday night, the Wall Street Journal, New York Post, Bloomberg, and the New York Times all put out stories saying that Cornell won the bid to build a tech campus on Roosevelt Island. Mayor Bloomberg will reportedly make the announcement Monday.

This latest development caps a tumultuous 72 hours in the year-long process of trying to build an engineering mecca that would transform New York into the next Silicon Valley. On Friday afternoon, Stanford–widely thought to be a front-runner and openly courted by Mayor Bloomberg–abruptly announced that it was dropping out of the race. Hours later, Cornell announced an anonymous $350 million donation towards its applied sciences campus proposal. Read More

Silicon Alley U

Stanford’s Tech Campus Plans Are Here and They’re ‘Spectacular’!

Sorry, Jerry.

With deadlines for proposals to build a tech campus in New York getting perilously close, Stanford went into more detail than ever before at a meeting of the university’s academic senate last night. Lisa M. Krieger from The Mercury News, who attended the meeting, calls the 500-page proposal “spectacular.

The specifics disclosed both help to understand Stanford’s vision in terms of how it relates to the school’s Palo Alto campus and gives some idea of the hoops other applicants have to jump through.

Stanford anticipates three decades of construction at an estimated cost of $1 billion to $2 billion. “The project is so breathtaking in its scope that the application process alone could cost $1 million,” reports the paper. Indeed, other schools Betabeat has contacted have mentioned the cost of hiring design teams and architects to meet the RFP’s specifications. And that doesn’t include the PR firms and lobbyists (to do “consulting” work) that both Stanford and Cornell have put on retainer.

According to Stanford’s plans, by 2045, the campus, which as reported will be on the southern tip of Roosevelt Island, could be home to up to 350 professors and more than 2,000 grad students in science, engineering, and entrepreneurship. Read More

Silicon Alley U

Cornell Keeps Gunning for That Tech Campus. But NYU, Columbia, Carnegie Mellon and Stanford Unveil Surprise Plans

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With less than three weeks left until proposals are due to build a Stanford-like engineering mecca on the isle of Manhattan, no one is taking any chances. Rumor may have it that Stanford proper is a lock for the contract. But as Betabeat has reported, a source familiar with the decision-making process says it’s pretty much about the RFP. (Even Mayor Bloomberg’s imprimatur is merely  a “small to medium plus,” said the source.)

Cornell’s PR firm and power lobbyist, hired to help manage the school’s campaign, seem convinced that a little community spirit can’t hurt. This Saturday, October 15th, Cornell will be the only academic sponsor for Next Jump’s Silicon Alley 500 recruiting event on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, matching engineers and engineering students with hot Made in NYC startups like 10gen, Etsy, Boxee, Meetup, SecondMarket, and Tumblr.

Cornell may need the good will. Over the weekend, NYU, Carnegie Mellon, and Columbia all showed a little RFP leg–with proposals that opt for Brooklyn and Manhattanville over Roosevelt Island. And this morning Stanford just announced that it’s partnering with CUNY and City College. Read More

Silicon Alley U

Will Stanford Take the F Train to Silicon Island? Tensions Rise as Deadline for Tech Campus Approaches

Here on Silicon Island?

“One of the things that infuriates me personally is we always seem to get left out of the conversation,” said Queens Civic Congress president Patricia Dolan. “Every time the mayor of the City of New York thinks about doing something wonderful, he should be thinking about Queens!”

It was a mild Monday evening in Flushing, a 15-minute walk from the last stop on the 7 line. Ms. Dolan, a “gritty, determined, old Irish biddy,” according to a recent comment on the local blog Queens Crap, was hosting an economic development forum to discuss, in part, Mayor Bloomberg’s plan to build a graduate engineering and applied sciences campus to rival Stanford’s program on the West Coast.

If replicating the talent engine that fuels Silicon Valley sounds ambitious, City Hall’s underlying vision is even more enterprising. New York City’s Economic Development Corporation has offered universities around the world a chance to compete for city-owned land in the hopes of besting the Valley, wresting the title of innovation capital from global competitors and remaking New York’s industrial landscape. So long Goldman Sachs, hello start-ups—if it comes to that, of course. Read More

Silicon Alley U

Forget Silicon Alley, Politicians Want Tech Campus in the Middle of the East River to Become ‘Silicon Island’

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Thus far the anticipation index over Michael Bloomberg’s big plan to bring an engineering campus to New York has centered around which university will win the bid. (The mayor’s rather sweet on Stanford, but Cornell is doing a full court press.) While those two duke it out, jockeying for position has swung back over to where, exactly, this campus will be located. NYC EDC has offered up three city-owned plots of land: the Navy Hospital Campus at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Governors Island, or the Goldwater Hospital Campus on Roosevelt Island. And the latter has come out swinging.

At a press conference earlier this week, Councilwoman Jessica Lappin (D-Manhattan) told reporters, “We want Roosevelt Island to be Silicon Island.” But as Capital writer Dan Rosenblum points out, the pitch wasn’t held on the would-be developer mecca, but rather a Manhattan plaza at the end of the Roosevelt Island Aerial Tramway, “the gondola that for many years was the only public transportation available to the island from Manhattan without going through Queens.” (You can now get there via the F train.) A spokeswoman for Ms. Lappin told Capital said they wanted to host the press conference “on the quieter island, but said that they also wanted to make sure reporters would come.” Read More