Chefs React

Smart Appliances Are a Tough Sell for NYC’s Fanciest Chefs

Cooking up a storm (Photo via Wikimedia).

Smart devices keep things exact, check up on humans and, in many ways, eradicate human error all together. So how does technology come into play in one of the few places where #tech sits on the back burner to creativity, tradition and deliciousness?

Upon realizing that many of us still cook like it’s 1995, Betabeat began wondering about the current and future use of technology in the kitchen, and more specifically, what professional chefs who have devoted their lives to the delectable art think of it all.

To find out, we talked to famed NYC chefs, some of whom have extensive experience with smart kitchen devices and others who choose to stay away. If we can conclude anything about the professional chef popular opinion on kitchen tech, it’s that there isn’t one. Read More

Genius Ideas

New Browser Tool Reveals Health Ratings of Your Fave Seamless Restaurants

Guess we're not ordering from A1 Sushi Cafe. (Screengrab: Chrome Web Store)

It can be jarring coming face-to-face with a restaurant you’ve only ever known through Seamless, especially if you discover the place is actually a total dump.

Now, you can rest assured your innocent-looking sushi isn’t coming from a cockroach-infested cesspool, thanks to Seamless NYC Health Ratings, a new Chrome extension that reveals the health ratings of Seamless’ restaurant listings. The extension pulls the health inspection data from NYC Open Data, and then displays the ratings on Seamless to the right of each restaurant’s name. Read More

Foodie Frenzy

New Portable ‘Food Photobooth’ Will Take Brunch Photography To The Next Level

The #dinnercam in all its glory. (Screengrab: YouTube)

Ever since Instagram fell into the app store from the heavens above, diners been dutifully dedicating the first few moments after the arrival of their sushi and molten chocolate lava cakes to snapping photos and choosing the perfect filters.

But some amateur photographers won’t be forced to settle for the low-quality iPhone food porn any longer.

A South African internet provider called MWEB created the #dinnercam, a machine seeking to “take social media food shots to the next level,” Gothamist reported. Read More

Gram It

NYC Chefs Hate Your Food Instagrams as Much as Everyone Else

(Photo: Instagram / Benjimanfood)

Food pics have long been the poster child of photo apps like Instagram. Crammed between the selfies and the screencaps of inspirational quotes, photos of food porn have become so ubiquitous that most of us scroll right by them without a second thought. But NYC chefs–particularly those steadfastly mounted upon Michelin-starred high horses–are beginning to foment a revolution against the Instagramming masses. Read More

KICKSTARTER SUCCESS STORIES

Kickstarter-Funded Restaurant Gets Seal of Approval from New York Times

Beware all ye mollusks who enter here.

When the proprietors behind Brooklyn seafood shack Littleneck couldn’t come up with the cash to get their restaurant started through traditional outlets, they took to the people: a Kickstarter campaign to fund Littleneck helped get them to where they needed to be. The restaurant opened, and only a few months in, they now have what every chef and restauranteur—especially in this city—dreams of: a seal of approval from the New York Times dining critics. Read More

Deal With It

Why Does Groupon Really Suck? Because It Makes People Eat at Bad Restaurants [TUMBLR]

the_big_deal_two

Ryan Sutton, food critic for Bloomberg News, can now add crusader to his resume. While the rest of us sit idly by, watching our inboxes fill up with offers to suspicious-sounding restaurants no one’s ever heard of and spas where we wouldn’t dare disrobe, Mr. Sutton is doing something about it.

Two months ago, he launched a Tumblr called The Bad Deal devoted to “highlighting BAD DEALS on Groupon, Gilt, Living Social, Savored and elsewhere,” in the hopes of saving consumers from “wasting their disposable income on crummy offers that are never redeemed.”

Exposing poor bangs for one’s buck is such a passion project for Mr. Sutton, that when Eater requested an interview about why he launched the site, he insisted on manning both the question and answer portion of the Q&A. We have to say, he really asked himself all the right questions. Read More

Apps

NYC’s 20 Most Popular Dishes According to Foodspotting

pork-buns

Food porn went mobile in 2009 when Alexa Andrzejewski (Adaptive Path), Ted Grubb (Get Satisfaction) and Soraya Darabi (New York Times) launched Foodspotting, an app for reviewing specific dishes instead of restaurants.

Foodspotting only wants the good stuff, though. Users upload photos of dishes (“noms”) they love, tagging each with a location. Read More