Planet Reddit

Reddit Back In The Red: Site To Give 10% Of Ad Revenue To Charity

Making money is cool. (Getty)

On Friday, Reddit made an announcement that it would be donating ten percent of its 2014 ad revenue to charity.

According to a blog post by Reddit CEO Yishan Wong, Reddit will calculate its ad revenue at the end of the year, and then let Redditors nominate and vote on the non-profits they’d most like to support. Once the community has determined its top ten non-profits — and yes, Reddit reserves the right to ignore all suggestions from trolls, the post says — the site will distribute the funds proportionally among the winning charities, based on how many votes each one received. Read More

In Loco Parentis

Insane Couple Asks Reddit To Name Its Unborn Baby Girl

"Please don't name me Salad!" (Wikimedia Commons)

In what’s sure to be the first in a couple’s long line of fabulous parenting decisions, two soon-to-be parents have asked the Internet for help naming their daughter. 

With the approval of his (probably long suffering) wife, the husband set up namemydaughter.com, where users can vote for their favorite first and middle names for the unborn baby girl. 

The husband explained himself and appealed to potential voters on Reddit, because obviously: Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: With Fab Cutting 80 More Jobs, Soon the Homegoods In Paramus Will Employ More People

Soon, this will be it. (Courtesy Fab.com)

Google said the number of user requests from government agencies has doubled in the last three years. [AllThingsD]

Fab axed another 80 employees yesterday as it continues its pivot to a Bed Bath and Beyond. [Valleywag]

Google reportedly gave Snapchat a $4 billion offer because saying big numbers is fun. [The Verge]

Under Armor scooped up app maker MapMyFitness for $150 million. [ReadWrite]

Nearly 62 percent of Reddit users read the site to get “news” thus blurring the definition of what qualifies as news. [Journalism.org]