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Techies Gather For a Real-Life Branch with Ev Williams and Jonah Peretti

Mr. Williams, Mr. Peretti and Mr. Miller.

The elevators to the BuzzFeed office are magnificently slow. Each fits about six people comfortably, and they trundle and groan up to the 11th floor, where the company’s ops, tech and marketing people sit. “Considering how fast the company moves, it’s amazing how slow its elevators are,” quipped one dapperly dressed man as we all awkwardly waited for the doors to open.

Betabeat was visiting the BuzzFeed office for the first time to attend a real-life roundtable. Hosted by Branch cofounder Josh Miller, the event included beers and mingling among some of New York’s prolific tech reporters and entrepreneurs, as well as a discussion with Twitter cofounder Ev Williams and BuzzFeed’s own cofounder Jonah Peretti. Read More

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Hype Man Henry Blodget Is At It Again, Profiling Mark Zuckerberg in New York Magazine

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This week’s cover story for New York magazine is a rather defensive profile of Mark “Watch Out My IPO Pop” Zuckerberg that seems designed to convince readers that Zuck having 57 percent of Facebook voting shares is a great idea. The piece is penned by none other than dotcom champion and Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget. In honor of Mr. Blodget’s reappearance in the mag, we considered opting for a BI classic like “The 25 Hottest Facts from Henry Blodget You Won’t Believe!!!” or even “CONFIRMED: Mark Zuckerberg Is a ‘Brilliant CEO'” as the story sets out to prove.

Unfortunately, the story is a write-around, which means Mr. Blodget didn’t get access to Mr. Zuckerberg–natural during the quiet period. And if you’ve read David Kirkpatrick’s The Facebook Effect, seen Zuck sweat on stage with Kara Swisher, perused Ken Auletta’s excellent profile of Sheryl Sandberg, or can name the founders of Andreessen Horowitz, there isn’t much news to report.

We did, however, enjoy Mr. Blodget’s opaque nod to that time he got banned for life from the securities industry for pumping up stocks in public, while he was bad-mouthing them in private:  Read More