Made in NYC

Ed Koch Hypes .nyc Domain Name In Long Lost Video

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New York Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office officially announced the sale of the new “.nyc” domains last week, hyping the release alongside city officials and borough chiefs. But Mr. de Blasio isn’t the first New York mayor to take a shot at selling New York on “.nyc.”

That honor belongs to the late Ed Koch, who was the champion of New York’s digital real estate long before City Hall was on board. In 2009, Mr Koch was hired by DotNYC LLC, one of the first companies who tried to sell the city on having its own domain name. Read More

Made in NYC

Prove You’re a Real New Yorker With New .nyc Domain

(Photo via .NYC)

If there’s one thing real New Yorkers love, it’s setting themselves apart from imposters. Between now and June 20th, New York City businesses can send in applications for a “.nyc” domain name.

Since domain regulator ICANN started approving thousands of new top level domains, everyone from cities to web giants like Google and Amazon been applying. Neustar, the company that maintains the “.us” and “.biz” domains, are handling the wholesale of the “.nyc” domains, and the City of New York will take a 40 percent cut of the sales. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: RIP MSNBC.com Edition

(Photo: Apps Blogger)

The New York Times got several anonymous sources to confirm that Apple is building an iPad with a 7.85-inch screen: slightly too big for pants pockets, but just the right size for a woman’s purse. [New York Times]

Meet Neustar, a Delaware-based company to which over 400 telecom companies route law enforcement surveillance requests. Not creepy at all! [Buzzfeed]

A University of Pennsylvania professor did some statistical analysis of Kickstarter’s failed projects. [AppsBlogger]

Soon, the Machines will be making our plane parts for us. [Wall Street Journal]

Comcast has bought out Microsoft’s stake in NBC, and MSNBC’s URL has been changed to NBCNews.com. This is supposed to “end brand confusion,” but we’re still completely puzzled. [New York Times]