startup rundown

Startup News: Brooklynites Can Now Learn Kickstarter at The Yard; DuJour Debuts

(Photo: The Yard)

No Sleep ‘Til Back in July, Betabeat revealed that Williamsburg-dwelling coworking space The Yard would be launching a General Assembly-like roster of classes–and at “Brooklyn prices,” no less. Well, the curriculum site is now live, with a full list of offerings. Examples include iOS app development for beginnings and Intro to Makerbot. A course on Kickstarter makes the joke about would-be creators of mason jar cocktail shakers almost too easy.

Your Digital Newsstand Now live: DuJour, an ultra-luxe magazine targeted to the rich and fabulous. Glossy photo shoots are all well and good, but DuJour hopes to distinguish itself by thoroughly integrating print and digital–meaning readers can finally click through to featured items that strike their fancy. Giving the pub a long leg up: A partnership with Gilt Group, which’ll allow the magazine to launch with a subscriber base of three million. Read More

New Education for the New Economy

Lore Launches a Rebuilt Platform, Aims to be a LinkedIn for Education

Meet the new Lore. (Photo: Screencap)

The latest from edtech startup Lore: Today the company debuts a rebuilt platform, designed to function more like a social network and less like those dreadful discussion forums you might remember from your educational days.

The rebrand fits with the vision CEO Joe Cohen was excitedly evangelizing when last we spoke. Back in April, the company shucked its original name (Coursekit) and christened itself Lore, a move meant to provide the team with more wiggle room. “Our vision is to be a platform for learning in whatever form,” he told Betabeat, but refused to divulge any details on what that might mean, product-wise.

In a phone conversation yesterday explaining the changes to Betabeat, Mr. Cohen was every bit as irrepressibly pie in the sky: Read More

Look At Me Now

TechStars NYC: Where Are They Now?

23 Photos

Spontaneously (Summer 2011)

We feel a little guilty. We’ve been fickle and easily distracted. Last year, the first two TechStars NYC classes were all we could talk about. But when their programs ended, we kind of forgot about them and directed our attention to the newest TechStars NYC class. Shame on us!

But back in the day, those first 23 companies were all the rage. Like shiny new toys, they were exciting and fascinating. There was even a reality television show about them. So even though their three-month, highly-competitive startup accelerator program has ended, these companies are still around. They didn’t just vanish into thin air. (Well, some of them did).

But all of this begs the question, where are these companies now? How have they fared in the big, bad world? Did they flop? Or surpass expectations?

We didn’t know, so we decided to find out. And it turns out that we weren’t the only ones who were curious about what these companies have been up to. Read More

New Education for the New Economy

Coursekit Is Now Lore; Peter Thiel Invests

Mr. Cohen. (LinkedIn.com)

Coursekit, which bills itself as a social network for higher education, is Coursekit no more. Henceforth the company will be known as “Lore,” a name which offers a little more flexibility for a fast-growing, still-evolving startup.

The company released a statement saying that the change “reflects the company’s ambition to be the global network of learners, instructors, and educational content.” Read More