Mysteries

Why Did Much-Loved Loosecubes Shut Down Five Months After Raising $7.8 M.? A Postmortem

The now-shuttered HQ. (Photo: Loosecubes)

Yesterday’s news about Loosecubes closing caught the New York tech scene by surprise. The company, one of the early movers in shared office space, just raised $7.8 million in venture funding back in June. They’d been a little quiet in recent months, and the coworking business is a competitive one, but no one figured Loosecubes was on the fast track to the deadpool. It was the kind of company that even non-techies easily understood and appreciated.

So the sudden shutdown, besides bumming out fans, left two nagging questions: What went wrong? And where did all that venture capital go? When we called, Loosecubes’ office number had already been disconnected. An email to their press team returned only a canned response from cofounder Anna Thomas: Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Gotta Get Down It’s Friday Edition

RIP, unconventional workspaces. (Photo: Loosecubes)

Thanks to Loosecubes, you can now work in a cutely outfitting shipping container, in Downtown Brooklyn. [Curbed]

Apple loves Daring Fireball. [Businessweek]

Mr. Ohanian goes to Washington, talks about “awesomeness.” [Washington Post]

Apple has no intention of ceding any musical ground to Internet radio, and so the company is apparently building a Pandora challenger. [New York Times]

Turns out Kansas City was very helpful with the process of building Google Fiber. [Ars Technica]

the startup rundown

Startup News: Time’s NYC 10 in Tech, Rx Sunglasses Online and Amazon’s Hot Sister

(Source: Warby Parker)

PERFECT TEN. Last Wednesday Time Inc. brought together editors from many of their news properties to bestow upon us the “10 NYC Startups to Watch.” Only in the startup picking game since lat year’s Internet Week, Time Inc. has already picked winners like GroupMe, which was purchased by Skype for a supposed $85 milion.

The startups that made the cut for 2012 are Adaptly, a social advertising platform; Art.sy, the Pandora of art; Codeacademy, an interactive self-paced tool to learn to code; Enterproid, a mobile platform to segregate work from personal information on a single mobile device; Fab—you already know what Fab does; Fancy Hands, a provider of virtual personal assistants; Loosecubes, a matchmaker for workers and workspaces SideTour; a community marketplace for booking and hosting adventures, Stamped; a five-star-only mobile rating app and Truth Art Beauty; an online platform where users can custom-create skincare blends.

FOUNDER POWER. This Friday Women 2.0 is hosting their New York Founder Friday at 16 East 34th Street. Featured founders Cheryl Yeoh of CityPockets and Eloise Bune of GraciousEloise will begin speaking at 7 p.m. but the event will kick off at 6 p.m. with an introduction by Matt Wolfrom of Makovsky and Company, the event’s sponsor. Founder Friday is free, and open to people of all genders, unlike the LOL-inducing “Jews against the Internet” rally, which is $10 and closed to women. Unfortunately, Founder Friday is already at capacity. Add your name to the wait list and cross your fingers.

RALLY IN THE ALLEY. The Association for a Better New York Foundation and Mayor Bloomberg honored the city’s technology leaders in Union Square last Thursday including Foursquare cofounder Dennis Crowley, Greycroft’s Alan Patricof, ideeli CEO Paul Hurley and NYTM cofounder Dawn Barber. The Lew Rudin Founder’s Award went to New York City deputy mayor for economic development Robert Steel. Read More