Teen Beat

LinkedIn, the Last Corner of the Internet Not Controlled by Teens, Will Soon Be Invaded by Teens

(Photo: LinkedIn)

Whenever you feel like escaping the grasp of teenage drama that pervades every corner of social networks–from Facebook to Twitter to especially Tumblr–you can always head over to LinkedIn, where adults are doing adult-like things like updating their job profiles with self-serious descriptions and posting links to stories about How to Be a Better Manager.

But beginning in September, that will all change. No longer will there be a single sliver of the Internet that is safe from Youths. Read More

For the Love of God Think of the Interns

We Are Worried About LinkedIn’s Interns

Oh boy.

Ritual humiliation of the interns (by themselves or others) is pretty much a summer tradition at many offices across the country. But it seems that LinkedIn has taken the form to new heights.

Not only is there a four-year-running tradition of interns “disrupting” the regular company all-hands for “a surprise flash mob performance,” but this caper is then filmed and uploaded to YouTube, where it can live forever to be mocked by the dregs of the Internet (a.k.a. YouTube commenters). This year’s installment opens with the Dublin office, which made some poor Russian kid sing “Galway Girl,” which seems awfully on-the-nose, right? Read More

XX in Tech

Too Hot for LinkedIn? A Startup’s Blocked Ads Spur Controversy

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Does LinkedIn have trouble believing that pretty ladies can be engineers? A tiff with Toptal, a networking site for developers, has folks wondering.

According to the Daily Dot, Toptal recently received a notice from LinkedIn saying that, “we had to reject the ads on the Toptal business ads account as many LinkedIn members complained about the women images you were using.” The vague, weird email added that if they edited the ads “using different images, related to the product advertised” and resubmitted, they’d be quickly approved. Read More

It's Zuck's World We're Just Living In It

Zuck’s Still Trying to Reroute All Your News Consumption Through Facebook

Indie film star. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The Wall Street Journal says that yes, the Facebook Reader is a real thing, and the company has been working on it for over a year. It’s probably more of a recommendation engine than an RSS product, and it reportedly “resembles” Flipboard.

The justification? Keeping those eyeballs on the page longer, meaning more engagement, meaning more ad dollars: Read More

Inmail

Linkedin Makes It Even Easier To Find Out Who’s Stalking You

Photo: Udi Milo

If all social networks were members of your family, Linkedin might be the boring uncle who talks about the inner workings of his accounting job at parties. Solid career advice, but you’re not exactly craving hourly updates.

But Linkedin has one feature that sets it apart from its online brethren — the “Who’s Viewed Your Profile” page, which provides users with a list of their social media stalkers. Read More

Inmail

LinkedIn Bans Prostitutes From Using Its Site

(Photo: LinkedIn Blog)

LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional network, has decided to ban prostitution, the world’s oldest profession. In an update to its privacy policy and user agreement, spotted by ReadWriteWeb, LinkedIn specifically calls out sex workers and asks them to please stop advertising their wares on the site. Read More

Nope

LinkedIn Forced Its Employees to Celebrate “Cinco de LinkedIn” for Its 10th Birthday

This happened. (Photo: Flickr)

Looks like LinkedIn cofounder Reid Hoffman is just using any excuse to get shitfaced. In honor of the company’s tenth birthday, he created “Cinco de LinkedIn,” a real company event celebrated by its 3,700 employees.

Not only does it sound moderately offensive, like drunk-sorority-girl-loudly-practicing-her-Spanish-at-Blockheads obnoxious, but it is also numerically nonsensical. At last check, cinco is roughly translated to “five” and not “terrible fucking idea.” Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: LinkedIn Ponies Up $90M to Buy News Aggregator Pulse

Scenic, boring West Virginia. (Photo: Flickr/tobyotter

As predicted, LinkedIn has shelled out $90 million for the mobile news aggregation startup Pulse. [AllThingsD]

Facebook is still the biggest social network for teens but they’re getting, like, so totally bored with it. Ditto YouTube. [Business Insider]

People who believe they’re “electrosensitive” are moving to a small town in West Virginia to escape Wi-Fi and cell phone service and other such rays. [Slate]

“Because people broadcast their lives on Facebook and Twitter and Vine, there’s a notion that everything that happens is going to be shared.” Social media is helping convince people they need to film their wedding proposals. [Forward]

Bitcoin has dropped 77 percent in two days. Hope everyone’s learned their lesson. [Business Insider]

Twitter is reportedly launching its music service sometime either today or this weekend, to coincide with–sigh, of course–Coachella. [AllThingsD]

Linkages

Booting Up: Pinterest Raises $200 Million at a $2.5 Billion Valuation

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Pinterest completed a $200 million funding round that values the company at $2.5 billion. Valiant Capital Management is said to have led the round, with previous investors Andreessen Horowitz, Bessemer Venture Partners and FirstMark Capital also participating. [AllThingsD]

IBM is making a push into mobile, and plans to provide customers with software, data and security services on mobile devices. [NYT]

Calling all youth correspondents: the social network Pheed is said to be gaining in popularity, especially with teens. [Forbes]

Facebook isn’t the only tech company to catch heat for using stock option deductions to avoid paying corporate taxes. The Center for Tax Justice says LinkedIn has used the deduction to avoid paying federal taxes for the last three years. [New York Post]

Eduardo Saverin talked about life after the Facebook, the challenges faces the social media company he helped found, and his decision to move to Singapore. “No, I did not rescind my citizenship for tax purposes,” is what he says. [WSJ]