shameless rumormongering

Booting Up: Now That Breaking Bad Is Over, Get Excited to See Twitter’s IPO Filing This Week

#NoNewApps. (Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

It begins! Twitter is scheduled to make its IPO filing public this week. [Quartz]

If it nails it, Pinterest has a pretty lucrative future in advertising. Customers coming from the site spent roughly $180 on ecommerce sites — more than triple than Facebook users. [Wall Street Journal]

If the government shuts down, the Library of Congress and National Park Service websites would also shutter. [ArsTechnica]

Aol is returning to television with an ad campaign promoting its new, pre-bundled package website called Gathr. But you’ll only see them in Atlanta, Seattle and Minneapolis. [AllThingsD]

Apple is the most valuable brand in the land, finally knocking those jerks at Coca-Cola from the top slot. [New York Times]

We the People

The White House Says They’d Love for You to Be Able to Unlock Your Phones So Take It Up With Congress

"Should I go for a black car?" (Photo: blogcdn.com)

At the end of January, it became technically illegal for you to unlock your phone without your carrier’s permission, even if your contract had expired. The call was made by the Librarian of Congress, who (for some reason) oversees exceptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and decided that cellphone unlockers would no longer get a pass. Read More

startup rundown

Startup News: The Library of Congress Has a Twitter Problem

Congress Fail Whale (Photo: blogspot.com)

API Rate Limit Exceeded Back in April of 2010, the Library of Congress promised to add every tweet up to that date to its famous archives. But like anyone following too many people at once, it’s just caused one big mess. The library now has an archive of approximately 170 billion tweets totaling to a compressed 133.2 terabytes. Now the librarians of Congress are planning to work with Gnip, the company currently organizing all of the data, to develop a plan for archiving all of the tweets.

Apparently there have already been more than 400 access requests to the Twitter archives from researches doing work on citizen journalism and political communications. Someone needs to teach the librarians how to make lists as soon as humanly possible. Read More