gatekeeper

On Social Media, Young Artists Blur the Boundary Between Performance and Life

Comedians Cole Escola (l) and Jeffery Self went from YouTube to cable TV and back again (Logo)

Jeffery Self and Cole Escola—a young comedy duo who parlayed YouTube success into two seasons of a cable TV sketch program—played two sold-out shows in New York this weekend, their first since splitting three years ago.

Separately, each has continued a trajectory of online mini-celebrity—especially Mr. Self, who moved to Los Angeles in 2010 and closely chronicles his personal life on social media.

Millennial, fearless and wildly funny, Jeffery and Cole exemplify a new generation of digitally native performers. But their audience is confronted with a challenge: when artists choose to broadcast their most private moments on social media, where is the boundary between life and performance?  Read More

Visiting Dignitaries

Lena Dunham Takes a Stab At the ‘Bougie Nightmare’ Of Working In Startups

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It’s been said that if Sex And The City were still on the air, Carrie would be dating a startup dude. (For related theories on how George Costanza would deal with Snapchat, please see @ModernSeinfeld.)

Lucky for Lena Dunham that her Brooklyn-based take on entitlement coincides with the rise of New York’s nouveau tech riches. We already saw boho babe Jessa slum it with a square venture capitalist. (Factcheck on his “Steal My Sunshine” mash-up, though: In real life, VCs are much more partial to posting indie rock or dad rock on their Tumblr. And we’re sorry to report you probably picked the same song of the year.) Read More