Political Animals

Heads Up, Instagrammers: It’s Actually Prohibited in New York (and Many Other States) to Share a Photo of Your Marked Ballot

Fierce. (Photo: Tumblr)

The Instagram army is out in full force today, smartphone drones snapping pics of every step of the democratic process, from the long polling lines to the braggadocious “I voted” stickers. But here’s a helpful PSA for anyone voting in New York state: those cutesy Instas could actually (technically) land you a misdemeanor.

According to Think Progress, sharing a ballot (or a photo of a ballot) after you’ve marked down your choice could actually be against New York State voter laws. NY Election Law 17-130 reads that a citation is in order for any person who “shows his ballot after it is prepared for voting, to any person so as to reveal the contents, or solicits a voter to show the same.” The Citizen Media Law Project confirms that “photos or filming of own marked ballot” is prohibited. Read More

Privacy Police

Your Traitor Facebook Friends Can Now Legally Show Your Profile to the Police

(Photo: Inquisitr)

If you’re not already particularly picky about who you friend on Facebook, you might want to think about rejiggering those privacy settings. According to GigaOm, a New York City federal judge ruled in a recent racketeering trial that it’s legal for police to view your Facebook profile if one of your friends grants them permission. Better start sniffing out the rats on your friends list. Read More

When Lawyers Send Letters

Nice Try, FunnyJunk: Indiegogo Says the Oatmeal’s Fundraiser is A-Okay

There were some other parts to Mr. Inman's response. (theoatmeal.com)

Round three of The Oatmeal versus FunnyJunk isn’t looking so great for the latter.

For those just tuning in: Earlier this week, accused of defamation and faced with a demand he immediately fork over $20,000 in damages, Oatmeal creator Matthew Inman launched an Indiegogo campaign to raise the money. However, he proposed to split it between the National Wildlife Federation and the American Cancer Society. FunnyJunk’s lawyer then alleged that the campaign was a violation of Indiegogo’s terms of service and that he would be petitioning the crowdfunding site to remove it.

Well,  it turns out that Indiegogo does not agree with that assessment. The company just sent us the following statement: Read More