Unproven Thieries

It Might Be Time to Let Oculus Rift Go — And That’s Okay

Just scrolling through some friend requests. (Photo via Getty)

It was not hard to predict this particular backlash. A Kickstarter darling, one of the golden children of the video gaming world and a particular favorite of the notoriously clannish PC gaming community, got bought by painfully mainstream social media empire Facebook for $2 billion. Geeky bleeding edge tech, meet ubiquitous Silicon Valley titan and platform for both Farmville and Cityville. The ever-wary video game community began to rage.

The company in question is modern virtual reality standard-bearer Oculus Rift, once among the most popular entities in the video game community, now shunned by its early supporters in hopes of gaining broader acceptance. Sort of like Lindsay Lohan in Mean Girls. Read More

Expert Thoughts

Here’s How I’m Spending the $589,660 I Raised on Kickstarter

I worked for many years in a corporate environment before starting Albino Dragon. In that time there was a vicious animal that always found its way into projects: scope creep. Let’s look at the what Wikipedia has to say about it first:

Typically, the scope increase consists of either new products or new features of already approved product designs, without corresponding increases in resources, schedule, or budget. Read More

Wearable Tech

Crazy Face Mask-Like Contraption Beams Video Into Your Eyeballs

Video

Looks pretty kewl, huh? (Kickstarter)

A new piece of wearable technology streams high-quality video directly into your eyes, and doesn’t make you look quite as much like a wiener as you do with Google Glass.

Avegant’s new product Glyph looks like a pair of ordinary noise-canceling headphones, except the band connecting the two ear pieces stretches across your eyes, instead of over the top of your head, making you look like some kind of creature from Star Wars. Using a technology called virtual retinal display (basically, a display with no screen), Glyph—which has raised a ton of funding through a highly successful Kickstarter campaign—projects video into your eyes that looks totally un-pixellated and freakishly real. Read More