Linkages

Booting Up: Now Bloomberg LP Has Its Own Venture Capital Fund, Too

(Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Has Google Maps ruined travel? (Only if your idea of a fun holiday is wandering the wilderness with only a compass and water bottle.) [Skift]

Bloomberg LP (which owns Bloomberg News) is launching a $75 million venture capital fund, because apparently that sort of thing is NBD now. [New York Times]

Forget over-sharing on the News Feed–teens are on Facebook to chat. [BuzzFeed]

The latest malware campaign to keep security pros up at night: NetTraveler, which in eight years has hit 350 “high-profile” targets across 40 countries. [Ars Technica]

Is Larry Ellison, lover of the high seas, actually terrible for the America’s Cup? [New York Times]

 

Hack Hack Hack Hack It Apart

Malware Has Speed Cameras in Moscow All Effed Up

It's like they're trolling George Orwell. (Photo: screencap, Russia Today)

How’s that brave new world  of connected devices faring so far? It’s going just great if you’re a Russian who drives like a bat out of hell, because some sort of malware infection has got Moscow’s network of speed cameras all screwed up. Welcome to the autobahn, baby!

The report comes from Russia’s Izvestiavia The Register. The city has an extensive system of cameras designed to catch offenders in the act and mail them tickets. It’s supposed to net something like $3.2 million in fines every month, which no doubt buys a whole lot of umbrellas for the meter maids. Read More

Flame I'm Gonna Live Forever

Kaspersky Lab Unearths Cyber-Spying Operation, Christens It ‘Red October’

RED OCTOBER

The Russian antivirus firm that first fingered Stuxnet as a state-sponsored cyberattack is outing massive clandestine digital operations once more. This time, Kaspersky Lab says they’ve uncovered a massive, years-long cyber-espionage campaign. The perpetrators: unknown. Demonstrating a rather charming flare for the dramatic, the Moscow-based researchers have dubbed the network “Red October.”

We had long Read More

The Russians

An Afternoon With Eugene Kaspersky, the Antivirus King with the Chesire Cat Grin

Mr. Kaspersky, with Mr. Alonso.

“The world I’m living in, which is the security world, is becoming more and more complicated,” Eugene Kaspersky ominously informed us. One would imagine: his Russia-based antivirus company, Kaspersky Labs, essentially announced the new age of cyberwar with the 2010 suggestion that Stuxnet must’ve been built with nation-state support. The target–Iran’s nuclear facilities–made it Read More

Malware Mischief

Many Hospital Medical Devices More Badly Infected Than the Patients They Monitor

Medical equipment. (Flickr/cote)

Even in the best hospitals there is a danger of acquiring vicious bugs like flesh-eating bacteria, pneumonia or even a new strain of tuberculosis. MIT’s Technology Review blog reports that medical facilities nationwide are now dealing with an entirely different class of bugs: malware.

Computerized equipment manufacturers apparently have an affection for out-of-date versions of Windows that may eventually put entire hospital computer networks in jeopardy.

Speaking last week in a Washington, D.C., meeting of a medical device panel, security expert Kevin Fu was unequivocal: Read More

Malware Mischief

Kaspersky Lab is Working on its Own Super-Secure Industrial Operating System

Mr. Kaspersky not looking supervillain-like at all. (Photo: flickr.com/cebitaus

Inspired by the behaviors of sophisticated malware such as Stuxnet, Flame, Duqu and Gauss, Russian billionaire and possible real-life Batman Eugene Kaspersky announced today that his Kaspersky Lab is developing a new operating system.

Mr. Kaspersky’s announcement wasn’t heavy on details about the OS, but security was obviously priority one. Acknowledging that Microsoft, Apple and the open source communities haven’t been able to create truly secure controls, Mr. Kaspersky basically said the problem with the previous systems was their universality: Read More

Flame I'm Gonna Live Forever

Meet MiniFlame, The Ninja Assassin of Cyber Warfare Tools

kasperskyminiflamedistrib

Researchers at Kaspersky Lab have been patiently picking apart the ingenious malware packages that romped through computer networks in the Middle East, sucking up data and destroying Iranian nuclear centrifuges and it seems Kaspersky finds a new addition to the allegedly U.S. and Israeli-sponsored family of cyber-weapons every other month. Monday they announced the discovery of the Flame malware’s baby cousin, MiniFlame.

Kaspersky’s bug hunters found that MiniFlame’s association with Flame and related infections was Transformers-like in nature: Read More

Flame I'm Gonna Live Forever

Russia’s Kaspersky Lab Cracks Password Attached to Alleged U.S. Cyber Weapon

(Image via Flickr)

The Cold War is over and Russia and America are getting along. So surely the Men in Black behind the United States’ cyber weapons program based at Area 51 or wherever will not be too concerned that a Russian researcher cracked an encoded password associated with the now infamous, allegedly American-made Flame malware.

Symantec and Kaspersky recently teamed to pick apart Flame’s command and control systems, discovering at least three previously unknown infectious scripts in the process. The researchers also discovered a great deal about how the weapons were assembled and launched against enemy targets, but were left with a hashed passcode they couldn’t break. They put out a call for help but didn’t need the assistance of anyone outside either outfit, after all: Read More

Flame I'm Gonna Live Forever

Researchers Uncover U.S. Footprints in Mysterious Cyber Warfare Tools

Attack workflow for Flame controllers (Symantec)

Kaspersky Lab and Symantec have teamed up to peel apart the United States’ cyber warfare efforts. So far, they have uncovered the command and control systems behind the sophisticated malware as well as three previously unknown chunks of malicious code possibly related to alleged American cyber superbugs Flame and Duqu.

Reuters reports that researchers from the security firms discovered how the malware was disseminated–through an outwardly innocent-seeming content management system (CMS) named Newsforyou: Read More