Visiting Dignitaries

Bored, Ashton Kutcher Takes to Quora to Explain His Steve Jobs Role

So method.

We’re less than a month away from the release of Jobs, the romantic comedy about Apple cofounder Steve Jobs’s life, and star Ashton Kutcher is already defending himself against the haters.

Last week someone on Quora asked the venture capitalist-lite why he chose the role and he answered. Laying it out in four bullet points, @aplusk explains that it was very difficult to pick up the role but the sweet pay check, rather, the challenges in playing the revered tech titan intrigued him. Read More

startup rundown

Startup Rundown: Tyra Banks’ Wallet Smizes at a New Startup and Uber Makes Your Friends Share Your Cab Fare

Viewfinder makes your photo albums super pretty and organized

Feast your eyes on Viewfinder Head to the App Store to check out Viewfinder, the sleek, newly updated photo-sharing app developed by a team of ex-Google and Microsoft folk. The app conveniently organizes your photos by date and location, and allows you to “dial through your memories” with a really cool, easy-to-use scroll-y device. You can also privately share your photos and instant messages with other Viewfinder users—like a more personal version of Instagram or Facebook. Maybe Viewfinder’s trying to make a subtle hint to hipsters posting photos of their vegan eggs benedict to Facebook: not everyone needs to see that. Read More

Apple in Your Eye

Feast Your Eyes on Ashton Kutcher as Steve Jobs in the First Jobs Movie Trailer

Ashton Kutcher as Steve Jobs

Today the world got its first glimpse of Jobs, the soon-to-be-released biopic of Apple’s legendary late cofounder. Directed by Joshua Michael Stern, the film stars Ashton Kutcher in the title role and Josh Gad (of Book of Mormon fame) as the lovable Woz. Viewers will watch Mr. Job’s journey from brainy college dropout working in his parents’ garage to world-renowned head of a multi-billion-dollar tech company. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Former Palm’s CEO Calls HP’s Purchase a ‘Waste’

Steve Jobs never would have done this! Probably. (Photo: ScreenRant)

“Talk about a waste.” That’s how former Palm CEO Jon Rubenstein described the purchase of the company from HP. As an aside, remember Palm? [Fierce Wireless]

Google is still the most popular search engine in the U.S., but Bing’s market share is rising. Microsoft’s site registered a 17.4 percent slice, compared to Yahoo’s 11.9 percent. [CNET]

Interns at Google are living the good life as they earn as much as $6,000 per month. That can buy them a lot of tickets for The Internship. [CNN Money]

Reddit is adding even more benefits for its Gold subscribers! The site is teaming with Uni Qlo to randomly select a member to receive a fancy gift from the Japanese clothing retailer. Hint, hint? [TechCrunch]

Get excited! Ashton Kutcher’s biopic Jobs is slated to be released August 16. [Entertainment Weekly]

Oh Okay

BeautifulPeople.com Launches Recruitment Site for Unemployed Hotties

(Screencap: BeautifulPeople.com)

If you’re simply too attractive to hold down a typical job, BeautifulPeople.com–the dating site for, yes, beautiful people–has got you covered. The Telegraph reports that the shallow dating platform has launched an employment agency for its 750,000 members that seeks to place attractive people in jobs where the primary requirement for getting hired is a symmetrical face. Read More

This Happened

Dedicated Method Actor Ashton Kutcher Was Hospitalized for Trying Steve Jobs’s All-Fruit Diet

Ashton Kutcher. (Photo: Irish Examiner)

Move over, Josh Brolin: there’s a new uber-dedicated method actor in town, and his name is Aplusk.

If you thought the recently released clip of the Steve Jobs biopic Jobs looked a lot like Ashton Kutcher walking and talking just like Ashton Kutcher but in a black turtleneck, you obviously underestimate his dedication to his craft. USA Today reports that just prior to shooting Jobs, Mr. Kutcher was briefly hospitalized for submerging himself a little too deeply into the character. In an attempt to get closer to his hippie entrepreneur character, Mr. Kutcher adopted Mr. Jobs’s all-fruit-and-nut diet. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Ashton Kutcher Helps Beat Off Winter Doldrums With Release Date for jOBS

So method.

Feeling blue about missing Sundance? Cheer up. Ashton Kutcher’s Steve Jobs biopic is slated to arrive April 19 at a theater near you. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Apple set a company record for iPhone sales last quarter, but it wasn’t enough to placate investors, who sent shares falling in late trading after Apple announced its quarterly results. [AllThingsD]

It wasn’t all bad for tech stocks. Netflix soared after the company announced better-than-expected profit on the strength of new subscribers. [Bloomberg]

Careful. The NYPD has a new device that detects the energy emitted by the rocket in your pocket. [NYDN]

“While I haven’t seen hard data on how this plays out across the industry, my personal experience has been that women in tech are primarily found in these emotional labor-heavy departments, even in the tiniest companies.” [Quartz]

Raaaaaaandi! [Fast Company]

Linkages

Booting Up: Countdown to the Ashton Kutcher Jobs Film

This guy. (Photo: Screenrant)

Not only is Starbucks accepting payments via Square, the coffee conglomerate is now also selling the Square credit card reader for $10 at its retail locations. [New York Times]

Spotify has suspended its music download service in the U.K. Users can still stream music, but are sent to an unhelpful FAQ page when they attempt to purchase it. [Pocket-Lint]

Kim Dotcom says the U.S. “planted” evidence, encouraging him to keep copyrighted files on the Megaupload servers but then punishing him when he did so. [Ars Technica]

That indie Steve Jobs film, that will star Ashton Kutcher and be an inevitable flop that we will still watch anyway, is slated for release in April. Who wants to go with us? [Wall Street Journal]

The New York state comptroller is suing microchip company Qualcomm for data about its political expenditures with the hopes it can bring more transparency to corporate political spending. [New York Times]