Linkages

Booting Up: Netflix Might Make Original Movies, Just Don’t Suggest Community

Man with the plan. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Windows phones used to be the last reprieve from brunch photos, but not so much anymore: an Instagram app will soon be released. [The Verge]

Netflix had itself a nice third quarter. Its subscriber base pushed past HBO’s with 31 million, the company raked in $1.1 billion in revenue and is mulling the idea of expanding into original moves. [Variety]

eBay is a hotbed for other tech companies looking to poach a well-trained CFO. [Wall Street Journal]

Speaking of both of those things, former Netflix CFO Barry McCarthy has decamped to mysterious startup Clinkle for a COO spot. [GigaOM]

Somehow, five million people downloaded BlackBerry’s BBM app yesterday so that’s neat. [CNet]

Antisocial Media

Celeb ‘Instassistant’ Has to Be the Most Stressful Fake Job of the 21st Century

Rihanna and her "Instassistant" Melissa Forde in an Instagram pic. (instagram.com/badgalriri)

We civilians are insufferable enough when it comes to having our picture taken for Instagram: “not that one, my face looks fat”; “try again so I can tilt my left cheekbone about 45 degrees east”; “did you get my shoes? I don’t know why you keep not getting my shoes.”

So imagine the psychological trauma inflicted when a famous person–a person whose pictures actually matter–uses Instagram. It happens, and real people are affected. Phoebe Luckhurst of the Standard has coined a term for the sad person stuck taking famous people’s Instagram pics: the “Instassistant.” Read More

your health

Incessant Instagram Brunch Pics May Help You Lose Weight

You can edit this photo of an omelet EVEN MORE. (Screengrab via Instagram)

If you avoid Instagram on Sunday afternoons due to the endless stream of mimosa-and-omelet photos it yields, you may be missing an opportunity for weight loss.

A BYU study found that maybe, just maybe, “seeing photos of certain foods, as opposed to eating them, still gives you a feeling of satiation, which makes those foods less appealing” when you go to stuff them in your face IRL, TechCrunch reports. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: BlackBerry Canceled Its Earnings Call But We Already Knew the Numbers Were Bad

Never going to die. (Photo: favim.com)

Quarterly results for BlackBerry are due out Friday and since they’re expecting it to be “gruesome,” it’s probably in the company’s best interest to just cancel the earnings call. [AllThingsD]

Instagram revamped its app to make it iOS7 friendly. Photos of brunch now stretch across the screen and user icons are now rounded. [The Verge]

Farhad Manjoo is really worried that Twitter is going to lose its weirdness as it pushes toward an IPO. [Wall Street Journal]

Twitter is doubling the size of its Irish office. [Independent]

The value of iPhone’s annual haul (nearly $90 billion) would make it the ninth-biggest stock in the Dow 30. Numbers are fun! [Bloomberg BusinessWeek]

Linkages

Booting Up: Jack Dorsey Approves of New York’s Transformation into Startupland

We're going to need some mouse ears. (Photo by Brian Harkin/Getty Images)

YouTube is supposedly going to soon let users save clips to their phones so they can watch them offline so that’s neat. [AllThingsD]

Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom said that he didn’t set out for the app to be a platform for fancy fashion ads, but since that’s where the money is, he’s totally fine with that direction. [TechCrunch]

“San Francisco is great. But New York has people, dynamics, intensity,” said Jack Dorsey, seeing the light. [USA Today]

There’s a new startup from former Facebooker Dan Fletcher called Beacon. Its premise? Be the “Netflix for news.” [Forbes]

AppNexus is creating a joint venture with fellow ad company Millennial Media to create a mobile marketplace that’s bigger than Google. [Business Insider]

Visiting Dignitaries

Your Instagram Mirror Pics Are Now Fashion Design Inspiration

Bow down. (Screengrab: Instagram.com/DVF)

Your selfies may be alienating loved ones and acquaintances, but according to the New York Times, Instagram users’ activity may actually influence real-life fashion designers.

It’s not so much that designers are crafting hot-dog-leg pants or building entire collections to look like they’re being seen through the Rise filter. Rather, they’re using Insta as a way to keep up with which aesthetics the masses are digging these days, and even–in the case of no less a designer than Marc Jacobs–crowd-sourcing jewelry designs from time to time. Read More