Delivery From Inconvenience

One-Hour Grocery App Instacart Finally Available To Manhattanites Below 110th Street

You might never have to come here in person again! (Wikimedia Commons)

Last month, we salivated over Instacart, the app that lets you order food from select New York grocery stores and have a personal shopper collect it and deliver it in as small a time frame as a single hour.

Today, Instacart shared good news: it’s finally delivering to Manhattanites below 110th Street. When Instacart first launched in New York, the service was only available below 34th Street, excluding the Financial District. Now a bigger percentage of Manhattan can experience the joys of having a friendly personal shopper bring a bag of fancy Whole Foods trail mix directly to your workplace to curb your 3 p.m. hunger attack. Read More

Delivery From Inconvenience

One-Hour Grocery App Instacart Comes to NYC

The app is really aesthetically pleasing. (Instacart)

Grocery shopping in New York City: it’s truly the stuff of nightmares. From never-ending checkout lines that wind through the cramped aisles, to the pain of negotiating your near-bursting bags down the subway steps, sometimes we just want to call it a day and order Seamless for the rest of our lives.

But wait! An app called Instacart, originally from San Francisco, is launching today in New York City. Instacart lets you order food from your fave local grocery stores, and then select your desired delivery window, which could be as soon as the next hour — we can’t even manage to fight our way into the Union Square Trader Joe’s in that amount of time. Read More

Hello Again Old Friend

Kozmo Is Dead, Long Live Instacart: A Y Combinator-Backed App for One-Hour Delivery

(Photo: Instacart)

Of all the ghosts of tech bubbles past, none looms as large in our memory as the ultimate flameout classic, Kozmo.com, which offered one-hour free delivery of any item on its site.

Oh, foolish Kozmo, how we loved you. Let us count the ways. One for the ability to order a pack of cigarettes, VCR, or a lobster dinner, all from the same place. Two for your strong-calved bike messengers, pumping up and down Broadway. Three for permanently gifting us with VHS tapes of “Magnolia” and “Edward Scissorhands,” forever housed in our parent’s bookshelf, after you went under. Shitty business model, glorious service.

So we’re particularly pleased to see that someone is resurrecting the concept, albeit with a little less boomtime hubris and much better planning skills. Read More