Delivery From Inconvenience

This NYC Startup Will Cheaply Store Your Excess Stuff in NJ

urBin makes storing all your winter junk easy and affordable. (urBin)

Spring is here, and we can finally pack away our colossal parkas and snow boots. But if you live in a tiny NYC apartment — many of which have nary a closet — it’s hard to find a place to store all your winter junk.

Enter urBin, the online service that whisks your stuff away to a storage facility and returns it again whenever you need it, all at the click of a button. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: All Innovation Everything

(Photo: Mike MIka)

Weird guys spying on women through their webcams sounds like something your dad made up in high school to keep you from getting a MacBook. Actually, it’s very real–and very creepy. [Ars Technica]

Some awww for your Monday morning: a dad hacked Donkey Kong so that his daughter could play as Paulina and rescue Mario. Who run the world? [Reddit]

“In fact, ‘innovation’ is something of a magic word around here, shape-shifting to fit the speaker’s immediate needs.” Finally someone fucking said it. [San Francisco Chronicle]

If you can’t catch a cab at SXSW, employees of ride-sharing service Lyft will give you a piggy back ride. Gimmicky! [AllThingsD]

Hookup app Grindr is responsible for revolutionizing the way we connect with each other? Sure why not. [New York Times]

Tao of Steve

Apple Files a Motion to Help Developers Targeted By Lodsys

lodsys.snapshot

Developers at WWDC were frustrated not to hear a word from Steve Jobs about the war patent firm Lodsys is waging against third-party developers. But at long last—okay fine, nine days later—Apple has come out swinging. Yesterday, they filed a motion to intervene in Lodsys’ lawsuit against seven small-time iOS app developers for an in-app purchase mechanism. The court has yet to decide whether it will grant Apple’s motion to act as an intervenor,which Lodsys has the power to oppose. But Apple has already submitted its answer to Lodsys’ complaint and a counterclaim. Apple’s proposed defense is that the alleged infringements are covered under an existing license agreement in Apple’s favor. Read More