Crowd Power

Indiegogo Bends Its Own Rules, Lowers Fundraising Goal for Hills Star Whitney Port

(Photo: Indiegogo)

A few weeks ago, Betabeat wrote about an Indiegogo campaign started by Whitney Port, star of The Hills and The City. Ms. Port began the campaign to raise $50,000 so that she could show her fashion line, Whitney Eve, at New York Fashion Week Spring 2013.

But today, when we went to check up on the campaign’s progress, the funding goal had mysteriously dropped by $40,000. Now, Ms. Port is only soliciting $10,000.

Betabeat has learned that Indiegogo agreed to change the fundraising goal for Ms. Port’s campaign. She is an Indiegogo partner, which is why both parties agreed to lower the goal. Read More

Crowdpower

Deadspin Launches Indiegogo Campaign, Asks America to Determine Market Value of Ryan Lochte DickPic

(Photo: Indiegogo)

“How Much Would You Pay To See A Photo Of Ryan Lochte’s Alleged Penis?” begs a headline on the irreverent sports blog, Deadspin. The post, which went up a little over an hour ago, is illustrated by a photo of Gawker Media employees clustered around a computer screen looking (and laughing) at an alleged photo of Olympic swimmer Ryan Lochte’s penis.

The pic, which is “a neck-down bathroom-mirror self-portrait, in which the tip of the penis almost but not quite reaches into the sink basin,” was provided by a source, who is demanding a fee. Deadspin has decided to start a fundraising campaign on Indiegogo, probably because Kickstarter doesn’t consider dickpics “art” (subjective!). Read More

Crowdpower

WikiWeapon Campaign to 3D-Print Your Own Gun Suspended by Indiegogo

(Photo: Indiegogo)

Though Indiegogo has largely been the go-to campaign site for non-artistic endeavors and bullied bus monitors, it turns out that there actually are some projects that the site will not allow. Forbes reports that a group of 20-somethings called Defense Distributed collaborated on a campaign called the Wiki Weapon Project to develop open source blueprints for a gun that can be made with a 3D printer. Read More

Fandoms

Tesla Fanatics Crash Indiegogo Trying to Build a Shrine to Their Idol

The property, in more glamorous days.

For decades, Nicola Tesla was the quintessential forgotten hero, largely neglected as everyone sung the praises of Thomas Edison. But we seem to have reached some sort of nostalgic tipping point, because suddenly the internet is falling all over itself to build a monument to the man.

Why? Betabeat talked to the instigator behind the movement, The Oatmeal’s Matthew Inman, and he explained it pretty simply:  “I thought, It’s a travesty. There should be a Tesla museum.”

A longtime Tesla fanboy, Mr. Inman has previously expressed his devotion with a comic titled, “Why Nikola Tesla Was the Greatest Geek Who Ever Lived” (and could have been subtitled, “And Why Thomas Edison Was the Devil in Human Form”). Many of Tesla’s newfound admirers, he says, were brought into the fold by that very comic, to the point that, “I sort of felt like I was this unofficial leader of Tesla fandom,” he told Betabeat. Read More

Crowd Power

Indiegogo Now the Official Fundraising Home For People Publicly Shat Upon

(Photo: Indiegogo)

Yesterday, a video surfaced on Reddit that showed a man ordering a free water at a Chick-Fil-A drive-thru, then verbally bullying the employee who happily served it to him. His rage was rooted in Chick-Fil-A’s discriminatory and widely panned policies surrounding homosexuality and religion, but his behavior towards an innocent fast food employee–who exercises no power over corporate decisions–came across as petty and meanspirited. Read More

Crowd Power

The Hills’ Whitney Port is Raising $50,000 on Indiegogo

A worthy charity cause. (Photo: Indiegogo)

If two TV shows, a book and a clothing line aren’t enough to line your pockets with the cashmoney you so deserve, what’s a glamour gal to do? Judging from Whitney Port, leggy star of The Hills and The City, the answer is start a$50,000 Indiegogo campaign.

Launching a gaudy charity for yourself? What on earth will Olivia Palermo say?

Ms. Port is raising money to help fund her Whitney Eve show at New York Fashion Week Spring 2013. Shhh, nobody say anything about the fact that she decided against using the vast amounts of cash she must have collected from her celebrity status, or her father’s apparel fortune, and instead chose to solicit it from her no doubt less wealthy fans. An Indiegogo campaign is an artistic endeavor.

And for your kindhearted philanthropic donation, you will get one of many swagalicious prizes, including a Whitney Eve gift card, an autographed photo–even a personalized tweet! Read More

Closing the Gender Gap: A Peek Inside Programs to Train Female Developers

The 20 Girls Who Code participants working out of AppNexus's Flatiron office (Photo: girlswhocode.tumblr.com)

“Maliyah, step away from the mouse!” called Ashley Gavin, a software engineer at the MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory and instructor at the Girls Who Code summer program. Maliyah Greene, the recipient of Ms. Gavin’s reprimand, reluctantly tore herself away from Photoshop to come and talk to Betabeat. We were sitting in AppNexus’s Flatiron office, watching her fellow Girls Who Code students work on virtually tagging brick walls with their names. “It’s not as hard as I thought it would be,” Ms. Greene smiled.

She is one of 20 high school girls who gave up summer vacation to learn about app development, robotics, web design and other topics at Girls Who Code, a summer computer-engineering program for girls.

Though this is its first summer in existence, Girls Who Code already boasts executives from Gilt Groupe, Twitter and General Electric on its board and has been working with AppNexus and other New York startups throughout the summer. Read More

Crowd Power

30,000 People Contributed to Bullied Bus Monitor Karen Klein’s Vacation Fund

(Photo: Pulse2)

Fundraising platform Indiegogo just released some interesting stats regarding the do-gooder campaign for bullied bus monitor Karen Klein. The fundraiser, which was launched last Wednesday by nutritionist Max Sidorov to raise money for a vacation for Ms. Klein after a video of her being bullied surfaced on YouTube, has raised more than $660,000 in just one week. Indiegogo, which takes a 4 percent cut of every campaign, stands to make more than $26,000 from the Internet’s philanthropy. Read More

Crowd Power

Indiegogo Campaign for Bullied Bus Monitor Karen Klein Quickly Gives Way to Self-Promotion

Video

Ms. Klein (Photo: Pulse2)

On June 19th, just before a heat wave clutched New York in its punishing grip, a YouTube user named CapitalTrigga uploaded a video to YouTube entitled “Making the Bus Monitor Cry.” The video shows a gaggle of middle schoolers from Greece, New York hurling vicious insults at a senior citizen bus monitor named Karen Klein, who is forced to don her sunglasses to hide the fact that she’s crying. The cruelty drags on for a painful 10 minutes and 9 seconds. Anyone who was bullied as a kid will certainly find it difficult to watch.

The local school district quickly moved into damage control mode and held a press conference about the video, but several enterprising Internet denizens decided to take matters into their own hands. A Ukranian nutritionist named Max Sidorov started an Indiegogo campaign with a goal of $5,000 for Ms. Klein to help raise money for a much-needed vacation following the incident. As of this writing, the campaign had raised over $175,000. Read More

Caveat Investor

Amateur Hour: New Crowdinvesting Rules Mean Everyone Can Play Venture Capitalist

(Photo: James Cridland via Flickr)

It was glaringly sunny in Washington, D.C., on April 5, the day President Barack Obama signed the JOBS Act, and there was some confusion as to the location of the afterparty. One faction of Rose Garden attendees gathered on the roof of the W Hotel and wondered where everyone was. The rest assembled at Off The Record, a dimly lit bar in the basement of the Hay-Adams Hotel, and kicked things off with an icebreaker.

About 30 smartly dressed men and women, still sweating out the adrenaline of being three rows away from the president, stood in a circle. Many had worked with each other but never met. Each stated their names, the role they played in the bill, and perhaps a few words about the brave new world of so-called equity-based crowdfunding, which had just been legalized by one of the six constituent laws that make up the JOBS Act. The new rule will allow “ordinary Americans,” in the president’s words, to invest in a nonpublic company in exchange for shares for the first time since the enactment of the securities regulation that followed the 1929 stock market crash.

The mood was triumphant and boozy. Tim Rowe, a Cambridge-based venture capitalist, raised a glass and offered a toast to working together in the future. “The Marine Corps was founded in a bar in Philadelphia,” he said. “Big things can happen starting in a bar.” Attendees signed up to join a trade organization for the newly minted market. “There was the sense of elation that we had cracked the monopoly of Wall Street,” one attendee recalled. Read More