Linkages

Booting Up: The Wall Street Journal Has Discovered Weird Twitter

(Photo: Twitter)

Members of Congress know as little about what the NSA’s up to as American citizens do. [The Guardian]

Here, have some unsolicited advice about how to solve the tech talent shortage from airplane aficionado Henry Blodget. [Business Insider]

Barry Diller has finally unloaded Newsweek onto IBT Media, but is keeping the Daily Beast in the IAC fold. [L.A. Times]

The Obama administration has vetoed a product ban on Apple that would mean the company couldn’t sell certain types of iPads and iPhones in the U.S. [New York Times]

“A part of a burgeoning Twitter subculture known as Weird Twitter, he is speaking in a purposefully nonsensical code that is meant to satirize the growing presence of corporate brands and marketers on the popular social network.” This is going to be a long week. [Wall Street Journal]

Americana

Business Insider Might Not Make a Mint, But Henry Blodget Is a Hell of a Hype Man

YO. (Photo: TechCrunch )

File this one under ‘second acts in American lives': This week, Business Insider honcho Henry Blodget gets the New Yorker treatment (subscription only, you cheap bastards), with a profile by none other than the bold-faced Ken Auletta. Sure, he’s still banned for life from the securities business (for now!), but being written up by Mr. Auletta ain’t too bad as a life consolation prize. Read More

Visiting Dignitaries

Why Yes, Groupon CEO Andrew Mason Would Love to Talk About Rumors of His Imminent Demise

groupon

Late last night, Twitter tongues wagged as to whether Groupon’s goofy CEO Andrew Mason would actually show up for his scheduled appearance at Business Insider’s Ignition conference in New York, especially after his name disappeared from the agenda.

“He has been off most relevant agendas for quite some time. The exception, of course, is the SEC watch list,” Interview Circuit founder Jon Sterling quipped, referencing the beleaguered company’s repeated run-ins with the commission (most recently over revenue details from its new business lines and questions about the daily deal site’s financial revision this spring.) Read More

shameless rumormongering

Rumor Roundup: Apple Aggressively Recruits Devs to Fix Maps, Jake Lodwick’s Office Ball Pool

Jakob Lodwick

It’s a gloomy, rainy Friday in New York, but we’re about to serve you a piping hot bowl of gossip. Bon appetit!

Map-maker, Map-maker, Build Me a Map! If Tim Cook‘s mea culpa wasn’t enough to demonstrate how hard Apple is scrambling to fix its iOS 6 mapocalypse, then how about its last ditch recruiting techniques to find Ruby developers? Mojo Talantikite, a cluster engineer at Engine Yard in New York City, said he (and a number of his technically talented friends) have been hit up by Apple recruiters recently.

“I don’t think it’s too out of the ordinary for a company to scramble to soak up talent once they figure out their product is deficient,” he told Betabeat by email. “But considering that the beta of Apple Maps was terrible three months ago, you’d think they would have started the aggressive recruitment phase then,” he said, adding, “It’s pretty easy to realize they are in put out the fire mode.” Read More

The Media Elite

The Rise and Fall of New York Founders on Vanity Fair’s ‘New Establishment’ List

photo (1)

Annie Leibovitz’s Silicon Alley photo shoot has finally made its way into print, as part of Vanity Fair’s annual “New Establishment” list. As we’d hoped, the magazine opted to pose Arianna Huffington in the sidecar of David Karp’s vintage motorcycle. (Guest appearance by Mr. Karp’s “French-English bulldog,” Clark.) Only in the version that made the October issue, Dennis Crowley is depicted emerging from a manhole, avec le swag. As before, the annual list is chockablock with tech types, but just like last year, Silicon Valley dominates.

Peter Thiel comes in at no. 37, repping for libertarian utopias between Tyler Perry and Ryan Seacrest. Elon Musk is no. 9 on the list, two rungs higher than Adele, but one spot below a new entrant: Pinterest’s Ben Silberman, no. 8. Despite Square’s caffeine-fueled growth, Jack Dorsey stayed at the no. 5 spot, but finally got the fashion props he’s been waiting for. “It’s a Prada suit; for everyday wear, it’s denim from Scott Morrison’s Earnest Sewn line, which was the first brand to use Twitter.”

Scattered among the elite are a handful of New York techies, present and accounted for. By and large, it’s the same group of people as last October, although it’s interesting to note how Vanity Fair assesses their power ranking, year-over-year. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Long Live Yahoogle Edition

(Photo: Top News)

Marissa Mayer is reportedly getting straight to work Googlifying Yahoo. She officially made the food in the Valley HQ free again, much to the delight of the company’s starving engineers. [AllThingsD]

Speaking of Ms. Mayer, Dave McClure thinks she should focus on transforming Yahoo into a female-oriented company. Unfortunately, he called his blog post on the idea, “Pink is the new Purple.” [500 Hats]

Craigslist is stifling innovation by suing PadMapper. [New York Times]

Companies actually listen to your online reviews. Rejoice, asshole Yelpers! [Wall Street Journal]

Presented without comment: “Mr. Blodget now presides over Business Insider from a makeshift standing desk in the middle of a 50-person newsroom in New York, where he barks questions (“Is it cool?” “Can we clip that video?”) at his reporters.” [WSJ]

Facebook Faceoff

Hype Man Henry Blodget Is At It Again, Profiling Mark Zuckerberg in New York Magazine

May14-12Facebook

This week’s cover story for New York magazine is a rather defensive profile of Mark “Watch Out My IPO Pop” Zuckerberg that seems designed to convince readers that Zuck having 57 percent of Facebook voting shares is a great idea. The piece is penned by none other than dotcom champion and Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget. In honor of Mr. Blodget’s reappearance in the mag, we considered opting for a BI classic like “The 25 Hottest Facts from Henry Blodget You Won’t Believe!!!” or even “CONFIRMED: Mark Zuckerberg Is a ‘Brilliant CEO'” as the story sets out to prove.

Unfortunately, the story is a write-around, which means Mr. Blodget didn’t get access to Mr. Zuckerberg–natural during the quiet period. And if you’ve read David Kirkpatrick’s The Facebook Effect, seen Zuck sweat on stage with Kara Swisher, perused Ken Auletta’s excellent profile of Sheryl Sandberg, or can name the founders of Andreessen Horowitz, there isn’t much news to report.

We did, however, enjoy Mr. Blodget’s opaque nod to that time he got banned for life from the securities industry for pumping up stocks in public, while he was bad-mouthing them in private:  Read More