health alert

These Rare Australian Berries Might Contain Cancer Cure

The drug made from the berries had a 75 percent success rate. (Screengrab: YouTube)

Today in surprising medical news, scientists now believe some rare, unsuspecting berries found in the far northern corner of Australia might hold the key to curing cancer.

After an eight-year study, researchers have discovered that Blushwood berries — found in the rain forests of Far North Queensland — contain a compound that might be able to destroy head and neck tumors, as well as melanoma, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reports. Read More

Go Home Science You're Drunk

People Who Binge Drink Are More Popular, Science Says

A room of very, very cool people, apparently. (Wikipedia)

Go grab the nearest alcohol vaporizer, because it’s been proven that binge drinkers are cooler than all their friends.

Men and women who frequently participate in heavy drinking tend to have higher social standings within their friend groups, the Daily Beast reports. The study, called Drinking to Reach the Top (guess we’ll have to rename our autobiography), is scheduled to appear in the October issue of Addictive Behaviors. Read More

Wiki World

90% of Wikipedia Entries on Costliest Medical Conditions Contain Errors

She learned how to do that on Wikipedia. (Photo: Getty)

In case you needed more proof that the Internet is a terrible, no good, very bad place to go for medical information, scientific research has now officially confirmed it.

A new study states nine out of 10 Wikipedia entries on the U.S.’s costliest medical conditions contain “many” factual errors, the BBC reports. In other words, you should definitely stop relying on the Internet for information on all your gross health concerns. Read More

Go Home Science You're Drunk

Kids Become Psychos When They Bite Chunks Out of Food, Science Says

Kids being k-k-kraaaazy (Wikimedia Commons)

Sometimes, when there’s nothing on TV and all its friends are busy, Science gets really bored and comes up with experiments like this: do kids act more aggressively when they bite chunks out of their food with their front teeth, or when their food is cut up?

Apparently, kids who use their teeth to tear off bites of food tend to behave twice as aggressively as those who eat food cut up with a knife and fork, the Daily Mail reports. Read More

Lawyers Guns and Money

This High Tech Injection Heals Gunshot Wounds in 15 Seconds

The XStat, pre-injection. (Facebook)

An Oregon based startup might have revolutionized the way we heal gunshot wounds.

Startup RevMedx, which develops products for military medics and members of the emergency services, has created a device that can heal a gunshot wound in 15 seconds, Popular Science reports. The device is called XStat, and its creators are hoping the FDA will approve it for use by medical professionals. Read More

your health

Spanx Is Squishing Your Organs So Time to Dust Off That Atkins Diet Book

Celeb and noted Spanx wearer, Kim Kardashian (Getty)

Because we know you’ve been tirelessly planning your outfit for the Academy Awards’ red carpet, we thought we’d better inform you that those Spanx you’ve picked out might literally be squishing your organs.

The Huffington Post recently asked a gastroenterologist, a dermatologist and a chiropractor to elaborate on the possible medical dangers of wearing Spanx and other shapewear, and their answers, quite frankly, are far scarier than your juice fast-induced bloating. Read More

Doctor Disruption

Hypochondriacs Rejoice: WebMD is Beefing Up Its Real-Life Doctor Support

She learned how to do that on Wikipedia. (Photo: Getty)

Imagine if your next false diagnosis of bone cancer or gout came from a real doctor instead of an automated database. This idea could be thrilling if you’re a sane person who happens to dislike going to the doctor–not so much if you’re an obsessive online symptom checker.

Either way, WebMD is getting closer to making it a reality. With their purchase of the health startup Avado, they’ll be beefing up their doctor-patient interactions–and possibly giving the Internet’s biggest hypochondriacs actual, not imagined, heart attacks. Read More