HBOKAY

Kara Swisher Has a Cameo Role in HBO’s ‘Silicon Valley’

Ms. Swisher on set. (Photo: Twitter.com/karaswisher)

Tech and entertainment junkies alike are practically frothing at the mouths over the premier of Silicon Valley, which debuts at South by Southwest today — and it turns out the show will have some Easter eggs in store for tech types.

Co-creator Mike Judge said the new show will be the anti-Entourage, which could be good or bad (but definitely not as bad as Betas, sry Amazon) on Friday during an interview with The Hollywood Reporter. Read More

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Booting Up: After Bad Publicity, AOL CEO Reverses Stance on Company’s 401(k)

A peek at Silicon Valley. (Photo: Recode/HBo)

Flappy Bird creator Dong Nguyen couldn’t handle the attention so he pulled the popular game offline. [Gizmodo]

Everyone settle down, the NYPD only has two pairs of Google Glass on hand and aren’t deployed in the field. [WSJ]

After his obnoxious comments about blaming “distressed babies” for rising costs, AOL CEO Tim Armstrong reversed his stance on the company’s 401(k) plan. [Washington Post]

Just 20 percent of traffic to Wikipedia is delivered via mobile devices and they’re trying to fix that. [New York Times]

There’s a trailer for HBO’s new Silicon Valley-themed show, uh, Silicon Valley. It’s very Mike Judge which is a good thing. [Recode]

planet netflix

Netflix Grows While Premium Cable Channel Subscriptions Drop

An HBO exec reading this. (Photo: HBO)

HBO is soon going to have a bigger breakdown than Amy Jellicoe: a new study reveals that consumers are spending their money on streaming video on-demand services (like Netflix and Hulu Plus) and getting rid of their subscriptions to premium cable movie channels, reports Variety

In the past 18 months, total U.S. households that subscribe to Netflix and similar services increased four percentage points to 27 percent. However, during the same time, the number of households who shelled out roughly $10 a month for the pay movie channels dropped six points to 32 percent. Read More

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Booting Up: Facebook Wants News Feed To Be More Like a Newspaper Since Those Are Doing Really Well

Not happening. (Photo: Facebook)

If Facebook’s VP of Product Chris Cox has his way with the redesigned News Feed, content from viral aggregators like BuzzFeed won’t be surfaced as frequently as they are now. [AllThingsD]

CEO Travis Kalanick says now that Uber has figured out how to deliver a car in five minutes, the possibilities for expanding its services are endless. [CNet]

“Twitter has taken over the public real-time internet. Now it wants in on the private one.” [BuzzFeed]

Even though HBO and Netflix both have a large library of movies and watchable original series, Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes doesn’t think they’re competitors. [The Wrap]

Everybody loves working at Twitter apparently. [GigaOM]

Linkages

Booting Up: Fab Reportedly Thinks It’s Worth a Billion Dollars Now

Let's hope this means more wacky pet products.

Fab is reportedly raising over $100 million, at a $1 billion valuation. That’s a jump from the $600 valuation the last time the company raised. [TechCrunch]

Netflix now has (just barely) more American subscribers than HBO. [Variety]

Apple Inc. is facing an identity crisis on Wall Street.” Sounds dramatic. [Wall Street Journal]

Matthew Keys, who was indicted in March for allegedly conspiring with Anonymous to hack the L.A. Times website, has been fired from his job at Reuters. Apparently they didn’t like a parody Twitter account he created, or his tweets about the hunt for the marathon bombers. [Atlantic Wire]

There’s a startup that wants to disrupt raising your hand in class, FYI. [GigaOm]

Cordcutting

HBO’s New Tactic for Promoting Game of Thrones? Courting Techies

Sure. (Photo: Hashgram)

As HBO drums up promotion of the upcoming season of Games of Thrones, the premium cable network is trying a different approach: cozying up with the digerati. (Historically, HBO has greeted the Internet much Night’s Watch would approach a horde of White Walkers.)

Last week, the cabler held elaborate Games of Thrones-themed events in techie hotspots like Silicon Valley and Seattle–home base to Internet giants like Amazon, Google, Netflix prone to disrupting the archaic television distribution process. Read More