App for That

This App Lets You Secretly Leave Annoying Group Texts

(GroupXiT)

Is there anything more annoying than being stuck in a group text about your second cousin’s bridal shower, and getting updated every time someone sends a message debating the pros and cons of bridal bingo? No. There is not.

Thankfully, there’s a new solution for that: GroupXiT, an app that lets you stealthily remove yourself from group texting threads you’re no longer interested in. Additionally, if there’s a person in the conversation who’s really annoying you — maybe someone’s using way too many wedding-themed hashtags — the app also lets you stop seeing their messages in the thread on your phone. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Just Kidding, Some of You Aren’t Getting Google Glass After All

See ya! (Photo: Wikipedia)

How quickly Google giveths, it takes away. The company said it rescinded its Glass offer to some of the #ifihadglass contest winners for not complying with the rules. Bitchy! [CNet]

Sue Gardner, the “driving force” behind Wikipedia’s rapid growth, is stepping down. But don’t edit her page just yet! She isn’t leaving the company for another six months. [NY Times]

Blackberry posted a profit last quarter but Blackberry owners are still waiting for the news to load on their phones. Perhaps BBM it to them? [AllThingsD]

Speaking of not-dead messaging apps, the Wall Street Journal digs into the rapidly growing sector of texting apps that’s siphoned $23 billion in revenue from carriers in 2012. [WSJ]

The BBC has a pretty great feature on the rise of dating websites aimed at people with sexually transmitted diseases, because everyone needs to be loved. [BBC]

App for That

GroupMe Won Mindshare Wars at SXSW

groupme

The group texting app most talked about at SXSW, at least on Twitter, which is what really counts, was GroupMe. That’s according to some analysis from folks at the interactive Pop Agency.

Pop looked at tweets from March 11-15 about GroupMe, Beluga, Fast Society, Kik and Yobongo. Not only did GroupMe garner the most chatter, 19 percent of that chatter was positive, nearly double the next most popular. Read More