Visiting Dignitaries

Grooveshark CEO Says He’s ‘Broke,’ Calls 2012 the ‘Year of Getting Punched in the Face 10,000 Times’

(Photo: Flickr)

Grooveshark CEO Sam Tarantino has a case of the Mondays, only this one’s lasted every single day for over a year. Between 2011 and 2012, both Google and Apple pulled Grooveshark, a music streaming service, from their respective app stores. Then Spotify launched with star-studded support and millions in funding and Pandora, another Grooveshark competitor, successfully IPO’d. Oh, and this was all before the lawsuit. By the end of 2012,¬†Universal Music Group had filed against Grooveshark and its employees for allegedly uploading copyrighted music. Read More

Music

Some Start-Ups Want to Share Music, Some Want to Lock It Away

tunesat

“TuneSat LLC, an audio fingerprinting technology company that enables music rights holders to track the usage of their music on TV and the Internet, announced today that it has raised over $6 million in a funding round led by General Electric Pension Trust, advised by GE Asset Management… ‘TuneSat is revolutionizing the music industry by giving content owners the tools and business intelligence to take total control of where and when their music is performed,’ said Scott Schreer, CEO, TuneSat.” Read More

Music

Evil Triumphs: RIAA Close to Squeezing Money Out of Limewire

limes

Dearly departed New York peer-to-peer filesharing start-up Limewire is close to a settlement with the Recording Industry Association of America, CNET reports, on track to “reimburse” that body for “damages” based on the premise that songs downloaded through the service represented potential sales. “Founder Mark Gorton said he saw most of his biggest competitors cease operating or try to legitimize their services after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against file-sharing operations like Limewire’s. He conceded that he chose to continue operating despite the court’s decision and the RIAA has shown that he pocketed profits as a result,” Greg Sandoval writes. Read More