Code or Be Coded

If You’re an Android Coder in NYC, Expect a Huge Salary

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Android is eating the planet as more people worldwide take up Android as either their first or latest smartphone. Problem is, those people need apps, and apps need coders to make them, and a number of hiring managers, founders and consultants here in NYC are coming up dry when looking for capable Android talent.

“Hiring for Android is almost impossible,” Ben Schippers, cofounder of dev-shop HappyFunCorp, told Betabeat. “You’re seeing a spike in Android use, and now we’re competing with Samsung, Facebook, Google and the Fortune 500 for talent.” Read More

the robots are coming

Artificially Intelligent Robot Scientists Could Be Next Project for Google’s AI Firm

Are AI scientists in our future? (Pixabay/geralt)

In late October, we wrote about the Neural Turing Machine, a Google computer so smart it can program itself. In the time since, it’s become clear that this is only the beginning and we should expect a lot more from DeepMind Technologies, the little-known startup acquired by Google who developed the human-like computer and sports the mission “Solve intelligence.”

In discussing DeepMind Technologies’s delve into the future of computers with MIT, founder Demis Hassabis detailed the company’s research and mentioned that he wants to create “AI scientists.” Read More

For the Love of God Think of the Interns

The Master List Of Tech Internship Salaries Revealed

(Data via Dan Zhang, Viz by Jack Smith IV)

Last week, we broke the news of a small list of what tech companies like Google, Facebook and Quora have been paying their interns. Turns out, that was just the tip of the iceberg.

Betabeat has obtained a dataset that dwarfs that list, as well as any other collection of internship offers we could dig up. The list comes from submissions (see “Methodology” below) from kids who have received offers at companies like Uber, Palantir, LinkedIn, etc. We’ve scrubbed the list clean and built an interactive for your masochistic pleasure. Read More

For the Love of God Think of the Interns

Here’s What Tech Companies Pay Their Interns; Prepare to Cry

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When most kids decide on their summer internship, they have to ask themselves tough questions: Can I afford to take an unpaid internship? And which potential offer is most likely going to lead to a job down the road?

Young coders, however, are more likely to wonder if $20,000 for the summer is really that much better than $19,000.

When Jessica Shu, a 19-year-old wunderkind at Cornell, was weighing her options for the summer, she wanted to be damn sure of her options. After digging around Reddit, asking colleagues and messaging around, she compiled a list of what Silicon Valley’s hottest companies are offering their interns — or at least were last summer — and posted it to Hackathon Hackers, a student coder community. Read More

Planet Google

Google Signs 60-Year Lease on NASA Air Base to Research Space Exploration and Aviation

The framework of Hangar One. (Wikipedia)

Today in existential crises, Google has just signed a long-term lease on an old Navy air base so they can research space exploration and aviation until we’re all dead. Fun!

The company has signed a 60-year, $1.16 billion lease for an 1,000-acre site on the NASA-owned Moffett Field Naval Air Station. The site, located on the San Francisco Peninsula, reportedly features a golf course, three hangars, and a working air field that Sergey Brin and Larry Page already casually use to land their private jets. Read More

the robots are coming

Google’s New Computer With Human-Like Learning Abilities Will Program Itself

Are we closer to AI? (Wikipedia)

In college, it wasn’t rare to hear a verbal battle regarding artificial intelligence erupt between my friends studying neuroscience and my friends studying computer science.

One rather outrageous fellow would mention the possibility of a computer takeover, and off they went. The neuroscience-savvy would awe at the potential of such hybrid technology as the CS majors argued we have nothing to fear, as computers will always need a programmer to tell them what to do.

Today’s news brings us to the Neural Turing Machine, a computer that will combine the way ordinary computers work with the way the human brain learns, enabling it to actually program itself. Perhaps my CS friends should reevaluate their position? Read More