glassholes

British Movie Theaters Ban Google Glass a Week After its UK Debut

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It was only last week that Google made Glass available in the UK for £1,000 (about US$1,700), but British movie theater chains are already banning Glass Explorers from wearing their new tech toys to the movies, The Independent reports.

The Cinema Exhibitors’ Association, which represents 90 percent of UK cinema operators, said that British Glass owners will be asked to remove their devices in the theaters, even when movies aren’t playing. Vue Cinemas, which owns 80 UK theaters, is going to be a little more lenient, asking Explorers to remove their glass after the lights dim. Read More

glassholes

This New Google Glass App Lets You Make Money From Streaming Your Every Move

Let your friends watch you do ~cool stuff~ in real time. (LiveLens)

Livelens, the video app that’s probably best known for using Nelson Mandela’s funeral interpreter in an advertisement, is now available on Google Glass.

The Tel Aviv-based app lets users record and stream live video to their friends followers. Users can also monetize their live streams by charging people to watch their videos. The app’s availability on Google Glass means you can literally live vicariously through your friends — at least those who are Explorers. You’ll be able to watch their live actions as if it were through their own eyes. Read More

Off the Media

Is Google’s Product Strategy Dumb, Brave or Both?

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There’s no question we live in one of the harshest media environments in history. Not that it’s necessarily always critical but rather, if you’re someone doing something in the public eye, you face a million media outlets all shouting to be louder than the others, publishing in real time, with little editing, little fact checking, and complete subjectivity.

In other words, it’s the mob. Read More

Gilded Googlers

Back To The Future: DVF Designs 80’s-Inspired Shield Frames For Google Glass

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Google has released photos of their latest effort in the war against fashion designers who seriously hate Google Glass. They announced in the middle of the night that as of June 23, you’ll be able to buy shades and frames for Google Glass designed by Diane von Fürstenberg. The new line will be available through the Glass website and luxury online retailer NET-A-PORTER.

This announcement follows the January release of their Titanium Collection and their recent plans to collaborate with Oakley and Ray-Ban. DVF told Betabeat that they’re waiting until their 2014 Resort Show to say more about the collaboration, but The Verge is reporting that the Glass by DVF will cost $1,620 — or $120 more than usual. Read More

Planet Google

Google Glass Eye Doctor Backtracks After Speaking Out About Eye Pain

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Since we reported statements from Google’s consulting optometrist about the eye pains associated with using Google Glass, things have been, well, rocky. Over the past week, we’ve had a series of contentious discussions with Google — it’s almost started to feel like a bad breakup.

As soon as our story went up, Google called us with their complaints — problems with tenor, tone and attitude. They’ve also offhandedly claimed that we took the doctor’s quotes “out of context,” but when we’ve asked for exact examples of what they meant, we heard nothing back. While we understand their feelings from a PR perspective, Google hasn’t been able to contest a single fact reported in our story. Read More

glassholes

Disappointed Explorer Pens 10 Reasons Why He’s Sending Back Google Glass

Just because.. (Photo: Tumblr)

Having been turned down by Google to become an Explorer last year, tech writer Matt Lake was excited to get his hands on a pair of Google Glass when the technology went on sale for one day last month.

But Mr. Lake’s excitement was short-lived. He claims that after three weeks of usage, he decided to send his Glass back for a refund. He also provided Google with a lengthy list of reasons why he was sending the Glass back, to serve as customer feedback. The list is now published on Computerworld, and confirms, once again, why Glass still isn’t ready for public distributionbesides the awful headaches. Read More