All Covered With Vines

FBI Releases Vine Star Jerome Jarre From Custody After Reading Fans’ Tweets

Mr. Jarre snapped a selfie before cops boarded his flight in Miami. (Twitter)

A funny thing happened on the way to Miami, when Vine celeb Jerome Jarre tried to shoot one of his six-second videos on an American Airlines flight.

The drama began when the social media star attempted to make a video of himself exiting the airplane bathroom wearing nothing but a speedo and an inflatable duck. Unfortunately, an American Airlines crew member was not impressed, and told Mr. Jarre he’d be arrested once the flight landed in Miami. Read More

I Fought the Law

Here’s the Lawsuit Twitter Just Filed Against the FBI

Screen Shot 2014-10-08 at 1.33.12 PM

Tech giants like Google, Twitter, and Facebook have a surveillance problem on their hands: they have created some of the most ubiquitous surveillance networks in human history, and now the U.S. government is taking advantage of those systems by making them hand over their records. Now, Twitter is trying to tell the world exactly what’s been happening.

In a blog post called “Taking the fight for #transparency to court,” Twitters VP of Legal announced that they’re filing a lawsuit against the FBI and the Department of Justice:

It’s our belief that we are entitled under the First Amendment to respond to our users’ concerns and to the statements of U.S. government officials by providing information about the scope of U.S. government surveillance – including what types of legal process have not been received.

Read More

Privacy is Dead

Say Cheese: The FBI’s Facial Recognition System Is Now Fully Operational

FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C. (Wikimedia Commons)

Remember that Big Brother-esque facial recognition software the FBI has been developing for a few years? It’s finally ready to go.

The FBI announced yesterday that its Next Generation Identification (NGI) system is now fully operational, the Verge reports. Among other features detailed here, NGI features the oft-fear-inducing Interstate Photo System (IPS), which stores millions of citizens’ photographs, and is designed to help law enforcement pair names and faces associated with criminal activity. Read More

Crime and Punishment

Alleged Pedophile On the Lam Caught in Nepal With Facial Recognition Software

Gotcha. (fbi.gov)

Nearly a decade and a half after fleeing New Mexico, an accused kidnapper and child sex offender was tracked down in Nepal using facial recognition technology.

Juggler and magic shop owner Neil Stammer jumped bail fourteen years ago, after being accused in 1999 of criminal sexual penetration in the first degree, kidnapping, criminal sexual contact of a minor, bribery of a witness, and battery, the BBC reports. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Twitter Still Can’t Make Up Its Mind About Its Design

New new new new Twitter. (Photo: Twitter)

For some users, Twitter looks different again for inexplicable reasons. [Fast Company]

Reported real company Lithium Technologies is spending $100 million to buy Klout. [CNN]

Get excited: Google’s $3.2 billion deal for fancy thermostat maker Nest has officially closed. [Recode]

Yahoo has plopped down $10 million for New York-based “social diary” app Wander. [TechCrunch]

FBI will pay you $10,000  “for information leading to the arrest of any individual who intentionally aims a laser at an aircraft.” [Ars Technica]

glassholes

Feds Interrogate Man Wearing Google Glass in Movie Theater

Hope he's not gonna wear those on his date tonight.

As if you needed another reason not to wear your dumb Google Glass in public—or ever, actually—an Ohio man claims he was yanked out of a movie theater and interrogated by federal agents, who believed he was illegally filming the movie with his face computer.

The man’s full account is posted on The Gadgeteer, but we’ll summarize it here so you can get the gist of it before you’re engulfed forever in this ghastly winter storm. Read More

Employee Don'ts

Dear Angry Sysadmins, Please Do Not Take It Out on Your Company’s Computers

Letting it ride is highly recommended.

For the last time: Frustration with your workplace does not justify a campaign of retaliatory vandalism. You are not the IT Count of Monte Cristo.

Today ComputerWorld spins the sorry tale of Long Islander Michael Meneses. The FBI alleges that he quit in a huff after being passed over for a promotion and, rather than simply sending out a few resumes, began remotely sabotaging his former employer to the tune of $90,000 in damages.

Prosecutors claim:  Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: People Love Their Chat Heads

(Photo: Facebook)

Facebook Home has already passed 500,000 installations on Google Play a week after launch, which just goes to show people love to throw away their friends. [The Next Web]

A cadre of Silicon Valley companies, including Google, Facebook and Microsoft, are quietly trying to kill a privacy bill in California that would give residents the right to know how tech companies are using their personal information. [insideBayArea]

Japan wants to stymie access to TOR by asking ISPs to flat out block it. [Wired]

Comedy Central is planning to host a comedy festival on Twitter because this is what the future is like now. [New York Times]

How technology helped the FBI track down the Boston Marathon bombers. [Washington Post]

It’s baaaaaaaack. [Valleywag]