Linkages

Booting Up: At The New York Times, A New Tech Columnist

Gone. (Photo: Yahoo)

It’s officially a shakeup for Yahoo: Jai Singh is leaving his position as editor-in-chief and will be replaced by CMO Kathy Savitt. [Recode]

Digg produced its first piece of original content yesterday. “We look at Digg as having the potential to be like any other editorial outlet that features freelancer content,” said editorial director David Weiner. [TechCrunch]

After just four months at the Wall Street Journal, Farhad Manjoo is moving to the Times as a Styles tech columnist. [New York Times]

Facebook is testing a trending topics feature because that doesn’t sound familiar at all. [Daily Dot]

Kyle Chandler is coming to Netflix in a series from the creators of Damages. [THR]

XY in Tech

Is That a Gadget in Your Pocket? Objectifying 25 Male Tech Writers

Sluttin' it up at CES.

News of the first annual Objectify a Male Tech Writer Day swept across the web this morning following an article penned by one of the event’s founders, gaming and social media reporter Leigh Alexander. “From booth babes to harassment, snide comments to double standards, women have often had a hard time feeling comfortable around the tech industry,” she wrote. In order to demonstrate “the absurdity of objectifying people you claim to agree with or support intellectually,” she’s encouraging female tech writers to give gendered compliments or make sexist proclamations to men about their work.

Though the actual Objectify a Male Tech Writer Day isn’t until February 1st, Betabeat–comprised primarily of female writers–could hardly contain ourselves. Here are 25 gendered comments for 25 of our favorite male tech writers. Read More

Wearable Tech

Augmented Reality Glasses Could Be an Awkward Person’s New Best Friend

Mr. Starner (cs.uoregon.edu)

In this month’s MIT Technology Review, journalist Farhad Manjoo got a chance to talk with a technology lead for Google’s Project Glass, Thad Starner. An associate professor at the Georgia Institute for Technology, Mr. Starner has been experimenting with wearable technologies since the mid-90s, and was tapped by Google to advise them on issues surrounding Project Glass, the company’s attempt to commercialize computerized glasses.

Ever the skeptical journalist, Mr. Manjoo went into the meeting expecting to find the glasses polarizing and detrimental to social interaction. Also: dorky and vaguely creepy. Instead, Mr. Starner successfully convinced him that Google’s glasses will actually amplify social interaction, stripping it of those awkward phone-checking asides and lulls in conversation when we go to respond to a text. In short, Google glasses could be a socially awkward person’s best friend. Sign us up! Read More