Tech Talent Crunch

Ad-Tech Feels the Talent Crunch In Silicon Alley

Competition for engineers and developers in NewYork is fierce, as it is in tech hubs around the country. It’s a well worn story that Silicon Alley competes with Wall Street for the best programmers. But there is another multi-billion dollar industry in the Big Apple hungry for those mathematical minds: advertising.

Over the last year, reports the New York Times, the number of want ads for highly technical positions has nearly doubled on the industry job board AdExchanger. The wave of big data is rich soil for advertising companies to mine, but it requires some serious quants to seperate the signal from the noise.

“The demand has far outstripped the supply,” said Joe Zawadzki, chief executive of MediaMath, told the NY Times. “The number of things that you need to know is high and the number of people that have grown up knowing it is low.” Read More

Talent Crunch

Even More Pressure to Find That Rockstar Engineer: VCs Might Not Fund You Without a Full Team

Those crazy hackers.

As if you weren’t already scrounging meetups for every killer coder or future CTO, Dow Jones has some bad news to report. According to VentureWire, several VCs and angel investors say that failure to show up at a pitch meeting without tech talent on your roster could hurt your odds of raising funds. “These investors argue that hiring the best people requires connections, and that founders who don’t have those connections will find that money is of limited use,” says the article. Read More

Alley vs. Valley

It’s Cheaper for Engineers to Live Well In New York City vs. the Valley

NY night

The folks at Focus have put together a handy infographic about earning potential in Silicon Valley where the number of jobs at internet companies (currently clocking in at 48,000) has surpassed the excesses of the dotcom boom. As Business Insider points out, the salaries listed (product and marketing managers make more than web developers and software engineers; Google engineers make more than those at Facebook and Twitter), don’t account for stock-based compensation.

But the chart does delve into cost of living, typically an area where New York City loses out, although apparently not compared to the Valley. Read More

Talent Crunch

On Boston Talent Raid, Next Jump CEO Says, Get em’ Young, Keep em’ Loyal

Charlie Kim knows how to woo young engineers: with war stories of the bubble days!

“During the dot-com boom we went from myself to 150 people,” Kim told students from Harvard, Brown and MIT last week. “By January of 2002 we were down to four people. Should died, but instead bloody noses every day for 90 days, pushed on and grew the company up, we’ll be close to 300 people by the end of this year.” Read More