Linkages

Booting Up: Google Is Distracting You From Reader’s Demise With a Smartwatch

Sad. (Screenshot: Google Reader)

Google is reportedly developing a smartwatch and a videogame console in case you were craving either of those. [Wall Street Journal]

The Army is reportedly blocking access to The Guardian and “some access to press coverage and online content about the NSA leaks.” It’s like that whole Snowden thing never even happened! [Verge]

If we’re to believe one of its former execs, Chinese ecommerce site Alibaba is probably worth $100 billion. [Wall Street Journal]

Gokul Rajaram, who was in charge of developing ad units for Facebook, has accepted a new position at Jack Dorsey’s Square. [Business Insider]

Google Reader dies Monday so here’s the latest in mopey “In Memoriam” piece. [Fast Company]

Linkages

Booting Up: The Media Seems to Have Misplaced Edward Snowden

Good morning, sunshine! (Photo: flickr.com/globochem)

Hulu’s up for sale, and depending on the buyer, it could mean big, big changes for the site. [New York Times]

After reports that Edward Snowden would be fleeing from Moscow to Havana today via Aereoflot, several reporters bought tickets and showed up–only too discover, too late, that Mr. Snowden wasn’t on the plane. They’re still stuck on the flight for Cuba. We’re guessing they no longer find Carmen Sandiego jokes very funny.  [Gawker]

Kevin Systrom says Instagram will come to Windows Phone and Blackberry before Google Glass. And it took them a veritable eternity just to get to Android. [Fast Company]

“Are we embracing a soft xenophobia applied to a sector rather than a race, to some cohesive elite tech class that doesn’t exist outside of our own minds?” [SF Gate]

The Bitcoin Foundation has gotten a cease and desist from the state of California. [Forbes]

Linkages

Booting Up: Controversial Man Once Bragged About Sex on Internet

Holla. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

No doubt you’ll be shocked to learn that the U.S. has apparently been hacking China for years. No? [ABC News]

Edward Snowden’s full of great ideas: “You have not lived until you’ve rolled over to post-coital Krispy Kremes. That’s what being an American is all about. I recommend them.” [Daily Mail]

MySpace is spending $20 million on an ad campaign for its relaunch, because somebody just cannot take a hint. [Ad Week]

Even if you’re using a “hands-free device,” electronic bells and whistles in your car are still big, fat distractions. [Computer World]

Human rights activists worry about the uptick in attempts by Southeast Asian governments to impose controls on Internet access. [Wall Street Journal]

Hello? Hello?

Surprise! In 2002, Edward Snowden Hung Out on an Anime Site and Called Himself ‘Phish’

Holla. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

No one’s turned up a Reddit account or Twitter handle for NSA leaker Edward Snowden. However, Reuters has managed to find what appears to be his long-abandoned profile for “a Japanese anime company run by friends,” written circa 2002. His aliases included “The True HOOHA” and “Phish.”

Because let’s face it, that’s pretty much what all of us were doing on the Internet in the early 2000s. (This reporter frequented a “Wheel of Time” fan site, for example!) Read More

Hello? Hello?

Good Luck Parsing Your Conflicted Feelings About Edward Snowden, Silicon Valley

Yesterday's rally.

At yesterday’s rally to support NSA leaker Edward Snowden, a software engineer who identified himself only as Michael huddled under Union Square subway entrance (just out of the pouring rain). “The fact that we have this man coming out now puts a face on this,” he said. “The human element is what’s most important, because most people think of these big surveillance things as these impassive, cold structures, but they’re the creation of humans, they’re the creation of people like me and you and all of us and there is a moral equation to all of that.”

He gestured to the northern edge of the park.

“Even in New York City, Union Square Ventures is right over there, which funded Tumblr, which is now owned by Yahoo, which is one of the companies that reported back to PRISM.”

But not everyone’s so sure of their feelings about Mr. Snowden. The occasional 1984 quote from Fred Wilson notwithstanding, the industry’s position in this whole mess is awfully conflicted. Read More

Hello? Hello?

A Start-ups: Silicon Valley Star Is Raising Money to ‘Reward’ Edward Snowden

"Shhh."

The tech world is still trying to figure out what to make of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden–but at least one man knows where he stands.

Facebook employee (awkward, right?) Dwight Crow has launched a Crowdtilt campaign to “reward Edward Snowden for courageously leaking NSA docs” with $15,000. So far the campaign has raised $11,660, which isn’t much of a reward for giving up your entire life.

Of course, you may remember Mr. Crow for his stint on the short-lived, Randi Zuckerberg-produced Start-ups: Silicon Valley. That is, if you actually watched it. (Most people didn’t.) Read More