Linkages

Booting Up: U.S. Officials Say Cyberattacks Are Originating From a Chinese Army Building

(Photo: Wikipedia)

An “overwhelming” percentage of cyberattacks on U.S. corporations and government agencies seem to originate out of a 12-story Chinese Army complex in a rundown neighborhood of Shanghai. [NYT]

Microsoft says it has signed up 60 million active users for its free, web-based Outlook email service, and that one-third of those users switched over from Gmail. [Bloomberg]

The liquidation of Ecomom was precipitated, at least in part, by aggressive bets on how much merchandise the ecommerce site could move. [PandoDaily]

A handful of developers in San Francisco and New York had a chance to play with Google Glasses earlier this month, as Google engineers sought feedback on their API.  [ArsTechnica]

Finally, the true tale of Times reporter’s John M. Broder and Tesla’s Model S sedan. [AllThingsD]

Linkages

Booting Up: Tesla Drivers Hit the Road to Prove Times Reporter Wrong

(Photo: @TeslaRoadTrip)

What’s an attention-whore to do when the press stops turning up? John McAfee had an idea: he gave two freelance journalists $2,900 in cash to follow him to the Caribbean and document his reunion with his 19-year-old girlfriend. [PandoDaily]

There may still be plenty of complex issues to be resolved before online gambling is legal in the U.S., but that isn’t stopping tech companies from lining up at the regulatory gates. [NYT]

Kim Dotcom says Mega is “the Privacy Company.” To that end, Mega is now accepting payment by bitcoin, and plans to offer secure email and chat services.  [Mashable]

After New York Times reporter John M. Broder wrote about the failings of the Tesla Model S during his road test along I-95, nine Model S owners attempted to create the trip. Four drivers completed the 353-mile leg between Rockville, Maryland and Groton, Connecticut, though of the five drivers who dropped out, none reported the battery failures that dogged Mr. Broder. [AllThingsD]

In the aftermath of Ecomom founder Jody Sherman’s suicide—and word that the company is heading for liquidation—an argument that “‘Killing It’ Isn’t Worth It.” [TechCrunch]

startup depression

After Suicide of Jody Sherman, A Call to Talk About the Emotional Strain of Life at Startups

jodysherman

This week, the startup community mourned the death of Jody Sherman, the Ecomom founder and CEO who was found dead on Monday. In the days that followed, Mr. Sherman’s friends and colleagues remembered his drive and generosity and sense of humor in a series of blog posts—posts that largely left out the cause of Mr. Sherman’s death, which the Clark County Coroner’s Office determined to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Read More