I Fought the Law

Here’s the Lawsuit Twitter Just Filed Against the FBI

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Tech giants like Google, Twitter, and Facebook have a surveillance problem on their hands: they have created some of the most ubiquitous surveillance networks in human history, and now the U.S. government is taking advantage of those systems by making them hand over their records. Now, Twitter is trying to tell the world exactly what’s been happening.

In a blog post called “Taking the fight for #transparency to court,” Twitters VP of Legal announced that they’re filing a lawsuit against the FBI and the Department of Justice:

It’s our belief that we are entitled under the First Amendment to respond to our users’ concerns and to the statements of U.S. government officials by providing information about the scope of U.S. government surveillance – including what types of legal process have not been received.

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WWDOJD?

Manhattan D.A. Joins Task Force to Combat Internet Crimes Against Children

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, Jr. (Getty)

A famous poet once stated that April is the cruelest month, but he probably didn’t even know that April is “National Child Abuse Prevention Month.” It’s kind of terrible that we as the human species need an entire month to remind each other not to hurt kids. But luckily, the Manhattan D.A. is coming to the rescue.

In order to fight against the proliferation of  violent and sexual crimes against children on the Internet, the Department of Justice has assembled a task force that will work to combat these crimes; today, the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office announced that it will be joining the thousands of law enforcement officials on the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program. Read More

SOPA Opera

Raid on Megaupload Rocks Cyberlocker Industry As Sites Stop Paying Uploaders, Delete Content, and Ban Sharing

via TorrentFreak

Who needs SOPA or PIPA to pull any sites associated with pirated copy asunder when you have a very public federal raid to scare you straight?

Cyberlocker sites have responded with “unprecedented action” to last week’s shutdown of Megaupload and the arrests of its founder and top executives. Since Thursday, TorrentFreak reports, a number of Megaupload’s popular competitors like VideoBB and VideoZer have done away with payment systems that rewarded uploaders when their files were shared. Filesonic (a top-10 site with a billion pageviews per month) and Fileserve took even more drastic action; both sites now forbid users to download any content they didn’t upload themselves. Read More

SOPA Opera

Feds Bust Megaupload, So Anonymous Hacks the DOJ, RIAA, MPAA, and Universal Music Group

You mess with the Internet, you get Anonymous.

Well now we know why we haven’t been able to access at the Department of Justice’s press release about its raid on Megaupload for the past few hours!

The websites for the U.S. Justice Department, the Recording Industry Association of America, Motion Picture Association of America, and Universal Music Group have all been down this afternoon. As TPMIdeaLab reports, hackers who associate themselves with Anonymous are taking credit. Twitter accounts like @YourAnonNews and @AnonOps claim the attacks are in retaliation for today’s shutdown and arrests related to the file sharing site Megaupload. Read More

Can I See Some ID

If the DOJ Has Its Way, Lying About Your Weight On Match.com Could Become a Punishable Offense

Is that even a real flower? Tell us or we'll shoot.

Maybe you should take it easy on the second helpings at Thanksgiving. CNET has gotten its hands on a statement that’s supposed to be delivered by the Justice Department today that would make things like using a fake name on Facebook or entering a false weight on Match.com a crime. Salman Rushdie, we hope you’re paying attention.

In the statement, the DOJ argues that the agency needs to be able to prosecute violations of a website’s “terms of service” policy.  While it opens users up to potentially frivolous violations, the DOJ says scaling back the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA),  “would make it difficult or impossible to deter and address serious insider threats through prosecution,” such as identity theft, privacy invasions, or abuse of government databases. Read More