shameless rumormongering

Rumor Roundup: Betabeat Becomes a Bunch of Glassholes, Prince Harry Hails a Hailo and Zuck Celebrates a Bday

(Photo: Tumblr)

Glasshole Missed Connection Betabeat finally had the distinct pleasure of trying the dorky looking face computer we love to mock so much at a party last night at Meetup HQ. We (only slightly drunkenly) approached a tall white dude donning Google Glass and timidly asked if we might be able to try it on. When we slipped on the device (in slate!), the display was incredibly blurry–not due to our eyesight, but because Glass specifically calibrates to the wearer’s eye. It was hard as hell to see, but the voice commands worked almost seamlessly, impressive since we were at a loud party.

The device’s functionality is fairly limited: you can take a picture, record video and get directions to and from places. It also has the added benefit of making you look like a complete dork while somehow also attracting swaths of attractive ladies to get up real close to your face. Read More

XY in Tech

Is That a Gadget in Your Pocket? Objectifying 25 Male Tech Writers

Sluttin' it up at CES.

News of the first annual Objectify a Male Tech Writer Day swept across the web this morning following an article penned by one of the event’s founders, gaming and social media reporter Leigh Alexander. “From booth babes to harassment, snide comments to double standards, women have often had a hard time feeling comfortable around the tech industry,” she wrote. In order to demonstrate “the absurdity of objectifying people you claim to agree with or support intellectually,” she’s encouraging female tech writers to give gendered compliments or make sexist proclamations to men about their work.

Though the actual Objectify a Male Tech Writer Day isn’t until February 1st, Betabeat–comprised primarily of female writers–could hardly contain ourselves. Here are 25 gendered comments for 25 of our favorite male tech writers. Read More

Funtimes at Foxconn

NYT Tech Columnist David Pogue’s Silence on Foxconn Persists, Even After the Times’s Damning Expose

The man and his muse

On the front page of today’s New York Times is a massive umbrella piece about China’s Foxconn—who manufactures, among other things, Apple iPhones—and the sub-humane, dangerous conditions their workers assemble these products under. It is, in many ways, as astonishing as it is unsurprising, and it’s as depressing a systemic problem as they come.

So what does the Apple fan’s Apple fan—the New York Times‘s own David Pogue, the (somewhat controversial) most widely-read technology columnist in the country—have to say about Apple’s relationship to Foxconn? Especially given the front page of today’s Times, do these sorts of revelations about their manufacturing processes change the way he feels and/or writes about Apple? Read More

Free PR Lessons

Now Is the Time to Tweet Your Start-Up at David Pogue

poguester

“Apparently, I’m the most influential tech journalist (and tweeter). Hmmm. What shall I influence today?,” the New York Times gadget reviewer tweeted in response to a study by PRSourceCode, a company that services tech public relations professionals (yes, you read that right), which identified Mr. Pogue as the “most influential tech journalist” and “most influential tech tweeter.”

His attentive Twttr following started responding immediately. “You should influence people to stop wearing socks with sandals,” “is there a way for you to influence my salary? Positively?” and Mr. Pogue, whose recent domestic abuse arrest rekindled old accusations that the man is an “insidious shill” for Apple and new accusations that his tech publicist girlfriend represents a conflict of interest, is retweeting it all.

Stop wearing socks with sandals? That’s like wasting your genie’s wish on a glass of lemonade! We don’t know what you entreprenuers are waiting for. What would PRSourceCode do? Tell Mr. Pogue to influence people to download your fucking iPhone app, S.T.A.T.

Alternatively, you could tell him to influence people not to throw things at their spouses.