Hack Hack Hack Hack It Apart

Even Literal Rocket Scientists Can’t Keep Their Social Security Numbers Safe

Someday, Bre Pettis. Someday. (Photo: flickr.com/usnavy)

Maybe Mat Honan is right–for all the importance we place on them, passwords don’t really work worth a damn. Many privacy breaches skip straight to the goodies, like social security and credit card numbers. The latest illustration: Reuters reports that NASA is telling employees that a laptop packed with personal information was lifted from a (locked) car.

Apparently there’s so much information “that must be reviewed and validated,” it could take as long as 60 days to notify everyone involved.

Free credit monitoring for everyone! Read More

Hack Hack Hack Hack It Apart

Cybersecurity Experts Concerned Hackers Could Steal Your Email Vote

(Photo: The Atlantic)

Superstorm Sandy washed and blew away some polling places and displaced thousands of residents in New York and New Jersey. New Jersey, in an effort to make sure every voice is heard, has enabled voting via email.

New York didn’t want to go with the email voting option because officials feel it might be vulnerable to fraud.

Writing in Norman’s “Security Exposed” blog, Norman’s vice president and GM Darin Andersen examines the problem of email voting.

Mr. Andersen writes that polling machines may have their own security problems but admits there hasn’t been reliable evidence of hacker interference in previous elections. However, Mr. Andersen is wary of email voting: Read More

Hack Hack Hack Hack It Apart

Hackers Torpedoed Coke’s Multi-Billion Dollar Deal to Buy a Chinese Corporation

Chinese flag

A Chinese hacking crew dubbed the Comment Group has been romping through corporate America’s computer networks for a few years now. The extent of the breaches wasn’t clear until Bloomberg published an in-depth report Sunday detailing in part how soft drink giant Coke was hacked in 2009 and didn’t tell.

The deep hacking of sensitive data from Coke’s systems destroyed a $2.4 billion acquisition deal with China Huiyuan Juice Group, which would have been the largest deal of its kind at the time: Read More

Hack Hack Hack Hack It Apart

In Which Defense Secretary Leon Panetta Freaks Everyone Out About Cyberattacks

Secretary Panetta. (Photo: flickr.com/usnavy)

Earlier this week, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta took a little trip to the Intrepid Air and Space Museum, where he gave a speech. The New York Times reports that in that speech, he proceeded to do what appears to have been his damnedest to scare the ever-loving crap out of everyone, everywhere about the prospect of cyberattacks on our precious bodily fluids American infrastructure.

Painting a picture that sounds an awful lot like a Michael Bay film, Secretary Panetta warnedRead More

Cyber Nukes

Iranian Atomic Scientists Reportedly Being Assaulted With AC/DC

THUNDA STRUCK!

Looks like the Iranian nuclear facility at Natanz is, at the very least, 0 for 2 against cyber attacks. First came Stuxnet, which wreaked havoc with the equipment used to purify uranium. And now–at least, if a recent report (via VentureBeat) is true–they are dealing with a malware infestation involving sudden, late-night AC/DC.

F-Secure chief research officer Mikko Hypponen received the following email from someone who claimed to be an Iranian nuclear scientist:  Read More

Things That Scare Us

Bad News: Some Sketchy Marketer Has Realized They Can Do Pop-Ups on Mobile

UGH. (Photo: Krebs on Security

Remember back in the mid-2000s, when everyone used to get those annoying “YOUR COMPUTER IS INFECTED” pop-up ads for anti-virus software?  (For that matter, remember pop-up ads?) Like anyone with an ounce of Internet savvy was going to download software marketed via sketchy pop-ups.

Well, get ready for a blast from the past, warns cybersecurity blogger Brian Krebs, because that same tacky, spammy tactic may now be coming to your mobile device.

Mr. Krebs tells the tale of one security consultant, who was doing a little dining-while-browsing, when suddenly, Read More

Launches

This Scrappy Brother-Sister Duo Scored $1 M. from Sir Richard Branson and Other Investors Before They Were Old Enough to Drink

Scott and Stacey Ferreira

MySocialCloud was still in relatively early stages last year when Stacey Ferreira, now 20, saw a tweet from investor and Virgin Group founder Richard Branson, which read, somewhat cryptically: “Enjoy intimate cocktails with me in Miami on June 15th – $2,000 to charity,” and including an email address to contact for more details. It was the perfect chance to pitch her startup, she thought. Read More

Dept of Don't Cry Wolf

Lots of People Just Assumed Emails About LinkedIn Passwords Were Spam

Careful, maybe there's a bill in there. (Photo: flickr.com/charlesonflickr)

Turns out lots of people don’t know the difference between legitimate LinkedIn emails and spam.

In the wake of last week’s massive password breach, the site sent users whose passwords had been hacked emails with instructions for resetting those compromised passwords. But, according to the spam fighters over at Cloudmark, a good number of the people who received them just chucked them into the junk bin:

This was a real email from Linkedin telling people whose password had been compromised how to protect their account. Over four percent of the people receiving this email, thought it was spam and sent it straight to the bit bucket. If Linkedin sends out 6.5 million emails, then a quarter of a million people are congratulating themselves on avoiding spam, and still have a compromised Linkedin password.

For the last time, people: Change your passwords. But also maybe LinkedIn might want to throttle back on the non-essential emails, so people stop assuming their messages are worthless?

(h/t Computer World)