rules of the internet

Getty Liberates Millions of Images Because You Guys Are Gonna Keep Stealing Them Anyway

We used our subscription to get this one — we couldn't get our text to wrap around the embedded image. (Getty)

In high school, our health teachers always said stuff like, “We know we can’t stop you from drinking, so here’s how to do it safely and not die.” 

Getty Images has just implemented a similar strategy, in a way; they knew people were going to find ways to use their images without paying, so they’ve just made it possible for anyone to use a bunch of their images for free — and without committing copyright infringement. Read More

Pirate's Life

Music Festivals Encourage Sweaty, Molly-Addled Rave Monsters to Pirate MP3s, Spotify Claims

These Glasto revelers totally look like the type to pay for their music. (Photo: Getty)

Young people who attend week-long music festivals to get wasted and rub up against each other may not be the upstanding citizens you thought they were, Spotify’s researchers insist.

Instead, Spotify found that after festivals, youngs are keen to “sample [artists' music] through unauthorized channels,” which is fancy BBC-speak for stealing music on the Internet. Read More

When Copyright's Wrong

Superstorm Sandy Delays Implementation of Copyright Alert System

Screengrab, Copyrightinformation.org

TorrentFreak reports that the Copyright Alert System, which some big Internet service providers were planning to implement Wednesday, is on hold. The system has been delayed due to adverse conditions following Superstorm Sandy, which threw a hugely destructive wrench into the works for many utilities and ISPs.

The Center for Copyright Information (CCI) is behind the system. CCI’s Executive Director, Jill Lesser, wrote a blog post explaining the delay, which read in part: Read More

When Copyright's Wrong

ISPs Set to Take ‘Mitigating Measures’ to Protect Copyrights

Screengrab, Copyrightinformation.org

Some of the largest Internet service providers (ISPs) in the country are set to take steps aimed at stopping illegal downloads.

The penalties can result in the repeat offenders losing their Internet access, though providers say it doesn’t have to go that far.

Wired names the participants and describes the series of measures, called the Copyright Alert System, that will be used to clamp down on illegal sharers: Read More

Cordcutting

In Counterclaim Against TV Networks, Aereo Compares Itself to the Advent of the VCR and DVD

via VentureBeat

Perhaps it’s public posturing in advance of its Wednesday launch, but Aereo couldn’t seem less bothered about the two copyright infringement lawsuits the startup is currently facing in the Southern District of New York. Case in point, yesterday afternoon Aereo filed a breezy counterclaim–not countersuit as reported elsewhere–against ABC, CBS, Disney, NBC, Universal, Telemundo, and more.

(If you’re playing catch-up with our coverage, here’s a quick primer: 1. For only $12/month, the Long Island City-based startup Aereo lets users live-stream and record broadcast TV to any mobile device. Because the startup also incorporates Hulu and Netflix and doesn’t require any additional devices or dongles, the IAC/Interactive-backed company makes cord-cutting even more of a reality.  2. Broadcasters no likey. On March 1st, two groups of broadcasters filed suit for copyright infringement.) Read More